Does aerobic conditioning cause a sustained increase in the metabolic rate?

Diane Elliot, Linn Goldberg, Kerry Kuehl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We measured the metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry for 90 minutes following exercise in six healthy individuals. Ten and 30 minutes of cycling at 80% of maximal intensity produced comparable increases in the resting metabolic rate, (37% and 32%, respectively) immediately after exercise. Howevery, by 30 minutes following exertion, the metabolic rate was not different from control values. The total additional caloric use during the 90 minutes of recovery was similar for the two exercise durations, and the mean increment in recovery energy expenditure was 11.4 ± 7.1 kcals. The majority of caloric use with exercise is during the activity. Recovery energy expenditure following usual aerobic training results in only a minor contribution to total energy use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-251
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume296
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1988

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Energy Metabolism
Basal Metabolism
Indirect Calorimetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Does aerobic conditioning cause a sustained increase in the metabolic rate? / Elliot, Diane; Goldberg, Linn; Kuehl, Kerry.

In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Vol. 296, No. 4, 1988, p. 249-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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