DNA palindromes with a modest arm length of ≳20 base pairs are a significant target for recombinant adeno-associated virus vector integration in the liver, muscles, and heart in mice

Katsuya Inagaki, Susanna M. Lewis, Xiaolin Wu, Congrong Ma, David J. Munroe, Sally Fuess, Theresa A. Storm, Mark A. Kay, Hiroyuki Nakai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our previous study has shown that recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector integrates preferentially in genes, near transcription start sites and CpG islands in mouse liver (H. Nakai, X. Wu, S. Fuess, T. A. Storm, D. Munroe, E. Montini, S. M. Burgess, M. Grompe, and M. A. Kay, J. Virol. 79:3606-3614, 2005). However, the previous method relied on in vivo selection of rAAV integrants and could be employed for the liver but not for other tissues. Here, we describe a novel method for high-throughput rAAV integration site analysis that does not rely on marker gene expression, selection, or cell division, and therefore it can identify rAAV integration sites in nondividing cells without cell manipulations. Using this new method, we identified and characterized a total of 997 rAAV integration sites in mouse liver, skeletal muscle, and heart, transduced with rAAV2 or rAAV8 vector. The results support our previous observations, but notably they have revealed that DNA palindromes with an arm length of a20 bp (total length, s40 bp) are a significant target for rAAV integration. Up to ∼30% of total integration events occurred in the vicinity of DNA palindromes with an arm length of ≳20 bp. Considering that DNA palindromes may constitute fragile genomic sites, our results support the notion that rAAV integrates at chromosomal sites susceptible to breakage or preexisting breakage sites. The use of rAAV to label fragile genomic sites may provide an important new tool for probing the intrinsic source of ongoing genomic instability in various tissues in animals, studying DNA palindrome metabolism in vivo, and understanding their possible contributions to carcinogenesis and aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11290-11303
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of virology
Volume81
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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