DNA fingerprints provide a patient-specific breast cancer marker

Suellen Toth-Fejel, Patrick Muller, Lyle (Bruce) Ham, Kevin Esvelt, Nicole Dumas, Kristine Calhoun, Rodney Pommier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Detection of systemic breast cancer recurrence is limited by lack of universally expressed tumor cell markers. We hypothesized that a test that detects genetic alterations specific to breast cancer cells of an individual patient would provide a superior cancer marker. Methods: DNA was extracted from blood, primary tumor, and axillary lymph nodes of 33 breast cancer patients and normal breast tissue of 12 control patients. A patient's genome was scanned by PCR amplification between Alu sequences. A DNA fingerprint of approximately 17-40 bands was produced for comparison between normal blood and sampled tissues. Results: There were 7 stage I, 18 stage II, 7 stage III, and 1 stage IV breast cancer cases; 33 of 33 cancer cases showed DNA fingerprint differences between blood and primary tumor (P <.0001).This test predicted 100% of positive nodes. No false-negatives occurred, and in two cases malignancy was detected in histologically negative nodes. Three of the 12 controls showed a single similar band change. Conclusions: DNA fingerprinting is a method for detecting and characterizing genetic alterations specific to an individual patient's primary tumor in 100% of cases tested. These specific changes were also identified in 100% of positive nodes, proving the capacity of the test to detect metastases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-567
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

DNA Fingerprinting
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Tumor Biomarkers
Breast
Lymph Nodes
Genome
Neoplasm Metastasis
Recurrence
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA

Keywords

  • Alu-PCR
  • Breast cancer
  • DNA fingerprinting
  • Tumor markers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

DNA fingerprints provide a patient-specific breast cancer marker. / Toth-Fejel, Suellen; Muller, Patrick; Ham, Lyle (Bruce); Esvelt, Kevin; Dumas, Nicole; Calhoun, Kristine; Pommier, Rodney.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 11, No. 6, 2004, p. 560-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Toth-Fejel, Suellen ; Muller, Patrick ; Ham, Lyle (Bruce) ; Esvelt, Kevin ; Dumas, Nicole ; Calhoun, Kristine ; Pommier, Rodney. / DNA fingerprints provide a patient-specific breast cancer marker. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 560-567.
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