Distribution of lung disease

Kathy Murray, Marc Gosselin, Mark Anderson, Grant Berges, Eric Bachman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Radiologists rely on imaging patterns to arrive at a diagnosis. The different morphological patterns in the lungs are well known, but less emphasis has traditionally been placed on the pattern of distribution. This important feature greatly assists in the differential diagnosis regarding many pulmonary diseases and is the focus of this article. Chest radiographs often result in a narrow differential if one understands the regional differences and microenvironments within the lung and takes into consideration the ancillary imaging findings. High-resolution computed tomography offers additional information at the level of the secondary pulmonary lobule to fine-tune the distribution pattern and, consequently, the differential diagnosis. Disease distribution is often as important as the morphologic appearance of the disorder. This article will approach pulmonary diseases from the perspective of distribution patterns, highlighting the more common patterns. The goal of this review article is to give radiologists a conceptual framework that may be applied in their daily work environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)352-371
Number of pages20
JournalSeminars in Ultrasound CT and MRI
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2002

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Lung Diseases
Lung
Differential Diagnosis
Thorax
Tomography
Radiologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Murray, K., Gosselin, M., Anderson, M., Berges, G., & Bachman, E. (2002). Distribution of lung disease. Seminars in Ultrasound CT and MRI, 23(4), 352-371. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0887-2171(02)90022-3

Distribution of lung disease. / Murray, Kathy; Gosselin, Marc; Anderson, Mark; Berges, Grant; Bachman, Eric.

In: Seminars in Ultrasound CT and MRI, Vol. 23, No. 4, 08.2002, p. 352-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murray, K, Gosselin, M, Anderson, M, Berges, G & Bachman, E 2002, 'Distribution of lung disease', Seminars in Ultrasound CT and MRI, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 352-371. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0887-2171(02)90022-3
Murray K, Gosselin M, Anderson M, Berges G, Bachman E. Distribution of lung disease. Seminars in Ultrasound CT and MRI. 2002 Aug;23(4):352-371. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0887-2171(02)90022-3
Murray, Kathy ; Gosselin, Marc ; Anderson, Mark ; Berges, Grant ; Bachman, Eric. / Distribution of lung disease. In: Seminars in Ultrasound CT and MRI. 2002 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 352-371.
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