Distinct extracellular matrix microenvironments of progenitor and carotid endothelial cells

Keri B. Vartanian, Sean J. Kirkpatrick, Owen McCarty, Tothu (Tania) Vu, Stephen R. Hanson, Monica Hinds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endothelial cells (ECs) produce and maintain the local extracellular matrix (ECM), a critical function that contributes to EC and blood vessel health. This function is also crucial to vascular tissue engineering, where endothelialization of vascular constructs require a cell source that readily produces and maintains ECM. In this study, baboon endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) deposition of ECM (laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin) was characterized and compared to mature carotid ECs, evaluated in both elongated and cobblestone morphologies typically found in vivo. Microfluidic micropatterning was used to create 15-μm wide adhesive lanes with 45-μm spacing to reproduce the elongated EC morphology without the influence of external forces. Both EPCs and ECs elongated on micropatterned lanes had aligned actin cytoskeleton and readily deposited ECM. EPCs deposited and remodeled the ECM to a greater extent than ECs. Since a readily produced ECM can improve graft patency, EPCs are an advantageous cell source for endothelializing vascular constructs. Furthermore, EC deposition of ECM was dependent on cell morphology, where elongated ECs deposited more collagen IV and less fibronectin compared to matched cobblestone controls. Thus micropatterned surfaces controlled EC shape and ECM deposition, which ultimately has implications for the design of tissue-engineered vascular constructs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)528-539
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume91
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Endothelial cells
Fibronectins
Collagen
Blood vessels
Laminin
Tissue engineering
Microfluidics
Grafts
Actins
Adhesives
Health
Tissue

Keywords

  • Collagen IV
  • Endothelial progenitor cell
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Fibronectin
  • Laminin
  • Micropattern

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

Distinct extracellular matrix microenvironments of progenitor and carotid endothelial cells. / Vartanian, Keri B.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; McCarty, Owen; Vu, Tothu (Tania); Hanson, Stephen R.; Hinds, Monica.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, Vol. 91, No. 2, 11.2009, p. 528-539.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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