Disrupted modular organization of resting-state cortical functional connectivity in U.S. military personnel following concussive 'mild' blast-related traumatic brain injury

Kihwan Han, Christine L. Mac Donald, Ann M. Johnson, Yolanda Barnes, Linda Wierzechowski, David Zonies, John Oh, Stephen Flaherty, Raymond Fang, Marcus E. Raichle, David L. Brody

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been one of the "signature injuries" of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, neuroimaging studies in concussive 'mild' blast-related TBI have been challenging due to the absence of abnormalities in computed tomography or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the heterogeneity of the blast-related injury mechanisms. The goal of this study was to address these challenges utilizing single-subject, module-based graph theoretic analysis of resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data. We acquired 20. min of resting-state fMRI in 63 U.S. military personnel clinically diagnosed with concussive blast-related TBI and 21 U.S. military controls who had blast exposures but no diagnosis of TBI. All subjects underwent an initial scan within 90. days post-injury and 65 subjects underwent a follow-up scan 6 to 12. months later. A second independent cohort of 40 U.S. military personnel with concussive blast-related TBI served as a validation dataset. The second independent cohort underwent an initial scan within 30. days post-injury. 75% of the scans were of good quality, with exclusions primarily due to excessive subject motion. Network analysis of the subset of these subjects in the first cohort with good quality scans revealed spatially localized reductions in the participation coefficient, a measure of between-module connectivity, in the TBI patients relative to the controls at the time of the initial scan. These group differences were less prominent on the follow-up scans. The 15 brain areas with the most prominent reductions in the participation coefficient were next used as regions of interest (ROIs) for single-subject analyses. In the first TBI cohort, more subjects than would be expected by chance (27/47 versus 2/47 expected, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-96
Number of pages21
JournalNeuroImage
Volume84
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Military Personnel
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Wounds and Injuries
Blast Injuries
Afghanistan
Iraq
Traumatic Brain Injury
Neuroimaging
Tomography
Brain

Keywords

  • Blast injury
  • Functional connectivity
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
  • Graph theory
  • Modularity
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Disrupted modular organization of resting-state cortical functional connectivity in U.S. military personnel following concussive 'mild' blast-related traumatic brain injury. / Han, Kihwan; Mac Donald, Christine L.; Johnson, Ann M.; Barnes, Yolanda; Wierzechowski, Linda; Zonies, David; Oh, John; Flaherty, Stephen; Fang, Raymond; Raichle, Marcus E.; Brody, David L.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 84, 01.01.2014, p. 76-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Han, Kihwan ; Mac Donald, Christine L. ; Johnson, Ann M. ; Barnes, Yolanda ; Wierzechowski, Linda ; Zonies, David ; Oh, John ; Flaherty, Stephen ; Fang, Raymond ; Raichle, Marcus E. ; Brody, David L. / Disrupted modular organization of resting-state cortical functional connectivity in U.S. military personnel following concussive 'mild' blast-related traumatic brain injury. In: NeuroImage. 2014 ; Vol. 84. pp. 76-96.
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AU - Barnes, Yolanda

AU - Wierzechowski, Linda

AU - Zonies, David

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