Disentangling cognition and emotion in older adults: the role of cognitive control and mental health in emotional conflict adaptation

Nathan Hantke, Anett Gyurak, Katie Van Moorleghem, Jill D. Waring, Maheen M. Adamson, Ruth O'Hara, Sherry A. Beaudreau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Recent research suggests cognition has a bidirectional relationship with emotional processing in older adults, yet the relationship is still poorly understood. We aimed to examine a potential relationship between late-life cognitive function, mental health symptoms, and emotional conflict adaptation. We hypothesized that worse cognitive control abilities would be associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. We further hypothesized that a higher severity of mental health symptoms would be associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. Methods: Participants included 83 cognitively normal community-dwelling older adults who completed a targeted mental health and cognitive battery, and emotion and gender conflict-adaptation tasks. Results: Consistent with our hypothesis, poorer performance on components of cognitive control, specifically attention and working memory, was associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. This association with attention and working memory was not observed in the non-affective-based gender conflict adaptation task. Mental health symptoms did not predict emotional conflict adaptation, nor did performance on other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that emotion conflict adaptation is disrupted in older individuals who have poorer attention and working memory. Components of cognitive control may therefore be an important potential source of inter-individual differences in late-life emotion regulation and cognitive affective deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)840-848
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognition
Mental Health
Emotions
Short-Term Memory
Independent Living
Aptitude
Conflict (Psychology)
Emotional Adjustment
Individuality
Research

Keywords

  • cognition
  • cognitive control
  • emotion conflict adaptation
  • emotion regulation
  • older adults
  • working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Disentangling cognition and emotion in older adults : the role of cognitive control and mental health in emotional conflict adaptation. / Hantke, Nathan; Gyurak, Anett; Van Moorleghem, Katie; Waring, Jill D.; Adamson, Maheen M.; O'Hara, Ruth; Beaudreau, Sherry A.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 32, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 840-848.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hantke, Nathan ; Gyurak, Anett ; Van Moorleghem, Katie ; Waring, Jill D. ; Adamson, Maheen M. ; O'Hara, Ruth ; Beaudreau, Sherry A. / Disentangling cognition and emotion in older adults : the role of cognitive control and mental health in emotional conflict adaptation. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 8. pp. 840-848.
@article{df39318be19541b981c06950d7aef00a,
title = "Disentangling cognition and emotion in older adults: the role of cognitive control and mental health in emotional conflict adaptation",
abstract = "Objective: Recent research suggests cognition has a bidirectional relationship with emotional processing in older adults, yet the relationship is still poorly understood. We aimed to examine a potential relationship between late-life cognitive function, mental health symptoms, and emotional conflict adaptation. We hypothesized that worse cognitive control abilities would be associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. We further hypothesized that a higher severity of mental health symptoms would be associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. Methods: Participants included 83 cognitively normal community-dwelling older adults who completed a targeted mental health and cognitive battery, and emotion and gender conflict-adaptation tasks. Results: Consistent with our hypothesis, poorer performance on components of cognitive control, specifically attention and working memory, was associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. This association with attention and working memory was not observed in the non-affective-based gender conflict adaptation task. Mental health symptoms did not predict emotional conflict adaptation, nor did performance on other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that emotion conflict adaptation is disrupted in older individuals who have poorer attention and working memory. Components of cognitive control may therefore be an important potential source of inter-individual differences in late-life emotion regulation and cognitive affective deficits.",
keywords = "cognition, cognitive control, emotion conflict adaptation, emotion regulation, older adults, working memory",
author = "Nathan Hantke and Anett Gyurak and {Van Moorleghem}, Katie and Waring, {Jill D.} and Adamson, {Maheen M.} and Ruth O'Hara and Beaudreau, {Sherry A.}",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/gps.4535",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "840--848",
journal = "International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry",
issn = "0885-6230",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disentangling cognition and emotion in older adults

T2 - the role of cognitive control and mental health in emotional conflict adaptation

AU - Hantke, Nathan

AU - Gyurak, Anett

AU - Van Moorleghem, Katie

AU - Waring, Jill D.

AU - Adamson, Maheen M.

AU - O'Hara, Ruth

AU - Beaudreau, Sherry A.

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Objective: Recent research suggests cognition has a bidirectional relationship with emotional processing in older adults, yet the relationship is still poorly understood. We aimed to examine a potential relationship between late-life cognitive function, mental health symptoms, and emotional conflict adaptation. We hypothesized that worse cognitive control abilities would be associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. We further hypothesized that a higher severity of mental health symptoms would be associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. Methods: Participants included 83 cognitively normal community-dwelling older adults who completed a targeted mental health and cognitive battery, and emotion and gender conflict-adaptation tasks. Results: Consistent with our hypothesis, poorer performance on components of cognitive control, specifically attention and working memory, was associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. This association with attention and working memory was not observed in the non-affective-based gender conflict adaptation task. Mental health symptoms did not predict emotional conflict adaptation, nor did performance on other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that emotion conflict adaptation is disrupted in older individuals who have poorer attention and working memory. Components of cognitive control may therefore be an important potential source of inter-individual differences in late-life emotion regulation and cognitive affective deficits.

AB - Objective: Recent research suggests cognition has a bidirectional relationship with emotional processing in older adults, yet the relationship is still poorly understood. We aimed to examine a potential relationship between late-life cognitive function, mental health symptoms, and emotional conflict adaptation. We hypothesized that worse cognitive control abilities would be associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. We further hypothesized that a higher severity of mental health symptoms would be associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. Methods: Participants included 83 cognitively normal community-dwelling older adults who completed a targeted mental health and cognitive battery, and emotion and gender conflict-adaptation tasks. Results: Consistent with our hypothesis, poorer performance on components of cognitive control, specifically attention and working memory, was associated with poorer emotional conflict adaptation. This association with attention and working memory was not observed in the non-affective-based gender conflict adaptation task. Mental health symptoms did not predict emotional conflict adaptation, nor did performance on other cognitive measures. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that emotion conflict adaptation is disrupted in older individuals who have poorer attention and working memory. Components of cognitive control may therefore be an important potential source of inter-individual differences in late-life emotion regulation and cognitive affective deficits.

KW - cognition

KW - cognitive control

KW - emotion conflict adaptation

KW - emotion regulation

KW - older adults

KW - working memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84992745450&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84992745450&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/gps.4535

DO - 10.1002/gps.4535

M3 - Article

C2 - 27445036

AN - SCOPUS:84992745450

VL - 32

SP - 840

EP - 848

JO - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

JF - International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

SN - 0885-6230

IS - 8

ER -