Discounting of delayed rewards and executive dysfunction in individuals infected with hepatitis C

Marilyn Huckans, Adriana Seelye, Jonathan Woodhouse, Tiffany Parcel, Lisa Mull, Daniel Schwartz, Alex Mitchell, David Lahna, Amy Johnson, Jennifer Loftis, Steven Paul Woods, Suzanne Mitchell, William Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Determine whether adults with hepatitis C (HCV), regardless of substance use disorder, are more likely to discount delayed rewards than adults without hepatitis C, and explore the relationship between delay discounting and neuropsychological functioning. Methods: Procedures included clinical interviews, neuropsychological testing, and a delay discounting task. Results: Regardless of substance abuse history, adults with hepatitis C were significantly more likely to choose smaller immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards. Delay discounting correlated with performance on executive functioning tasks. Conclusions: Increased discounting is associated with broad executive dysfunction, suggesting that HCV-associated executive dysfunction may lead to altered decision-making style.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-186
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Reward
Substance-Related Disorders
Decision Making
Interviews
Delay Discounting

Keywords

  • Delay discounting
  • Hepatitis C
  • Impulsive behavior
  • Neuropsychology
  • Substance-related disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Discounting of delayed rewards and executive dysfunction in individuals infected with hepatitis C. / Huckans, Marilyn; Seelye, Adriana; Woodhouse, Jonathan; Parcel, Tiffany; Mull, Lisa; Schwartz, Daniel; Mitchell, Alex; Lahna, David; Johnson, Amy; Loftis, Jennifer; Woods, Steven Paul; Mitchell, Suzanne; Hoffman, William.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 33, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 176-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huckans, M, Seelye, A, Woodhouse, J, Parcel, T, Mull, L, Schwartz, D, Mitchell, A, Lahna, D, Johnson, A, Loftis, J, Woods, SP, Mitchell, S & Hoffman, W 2011, 'Discounting of delayed rewards and executive dysfunction in individuals infected with hepatitis C', Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 176-186. https://doi.org/10.1080/13803395.2010.499355
Huckans, Marilyn ; Seelye, Adriana ; Woodhouse, Jonathan ; Parcel, Tiffany ; Mull, Lisa ; Schwartz, Daniel ; Mitchell, Alex ; Lahna, David ; Johnson, Amy ; Loftis, Jennifer ; Woods, Steven Paul ; Mitchell, Suzanne ; Hoffman, William. / Discounting of delayed rewards and executive dysfunction in individuals infected with hepatitis C. In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 176-186.
@article{23b1be52bfb64cce8fbbefdd95598e34,
title = "Discounting of delayed rewards and executive dysfunction in individuals infected with hepatitis C",
abstract = "Objective: Determine whether adults with hepatitis C (HCV), regardless of substance use disorder, are more likely to discount delayed rewards than adults without hepatitis C, and explore the relationship between delay discounting and neuropsychological functioning. Methods: Procedures included clinical interviews, neuropsychological testing, and a delay discounting task. Results: Regardless of substance abuse history, adults with hepatitis C were significantly more likely to choose smaller immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards. Delay discounting correlated with performance on executive functioning tasks. Conclusions: Increased discounting is associated with broad executive dysfunction, suggesting that HCV-associated executive dysfunction may lead to altered decision-making style.",
keywords = "Delay discounting, Hepatitis C, Impulsive behavior, Neuropsychology, Substance-related disorders",
author = "Marilyn Huckans and Adriana Seelye and Jonathan Woodhouse and Tiffany Parcel and Lisa Mull and Daniel Schwartz and Alex Mitchell and David Lahna and Amy Johnson and Jennifer Loftis and Woods, {Steven Paul} and Suzanne Mitchell and William Hoffman",
year = "2011",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1080/13803395.2010.499355",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "176--186",
journal = "Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology",
issn = "0168-8634",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Discounting of delayed rewards and executive dysfunction in individuals infected with hepatitis C

AU - Huckans, Marilyn

AU - Seelye, Adriana

AU - Woodhouse, Jonathan

AU - Parcel, Tiffany

AU - Mull, Lisa

AU - Schwartz, Daniel

AU - Mitchell, Alex

AU - Lahna, David

AU - Johnson, Amy

AU - Loftis, Jennifer

AU - Woods, Steven Paul

AU - Mitchell, Suzanne

AU - Hoffman, William

PY - 2011/2

Y1 - 2011/2

N2 - Objective: Determine whether adults with hepatitis C (HCV), regardless of substance use disorder, are more likely to discount delayed rewards than adults without hepatitis C, and explore the relationship between delay discounting and neuropsychological functioning. Methods: Procedures included clinical interviews, neuropsychological testing, and a delay discounting task. Results: Regardless of substance abuse history, adults with hepatitis C were significantly more likely to choose smaller immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards. Delay discounting correlated with performance on executive functioning tasks. Conclusions: Increased discounting is associated with broad executive dysfunction, suggesting that HCV-associated executive dysfunction may lead to altered decision-making style.

AB - Objective: Determine whether adults with hepatitis C (HCV), regardless of substance use disorder, are more likely to discount delayed rewards than adults without hepatitis C, and explore the relationship between delay discounting and neuropsychological functioning. Methods: Procedures included clinical interviews, neuropsychological testing, and a delay discounting task. Results: Regardless of substance abuse history, adults with hepatitis C were significantly more likely to choose smaller immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards. Delay discounting correlated with performance on executive functioning tasks. Conclusions: Increased discounting is associated with broad executive dysfunction, suggesting that HCV-associated executive dysfunction may lead to altered decision-making style.

KW - Delay discounting

KW - Hepatitis C

KW - Impulsive behavior

KW - Neuropsychology

KW - Substance-related disorders

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79551717339&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79551717339&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13803395.2010.499355

DO - 10.1080/13803395.2010.499355

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 176

EP - 186

JO - Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

JF - Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

SN - 0168-8634

IS - 2

ER -