Direction selectivity in the retina

Symmetry and asymmetry in structure and function

David I. Vaney, Benjamin Sivyer, William Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

151 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Visual information is processed in the retina to a remarkable degree before it is transmitted to higher visual centres. Several types of retinal ganglion cells (the output neurons of the retina) respond preferentially to image motion in a particular direction, and each type of direction-selective ganglion cell (DSGC) is comprised of multiple subtypes with different preferred directions. The direction selectivity of the cells is generated by diverse mechanisms operating within microcircuits that rely on independent neuronal processing in individual dendrites of both the DSGCs and the presynaptic neurons that innervate them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-208
Number of pages15
JournalNature Reviews Neuroscience
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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Retina
Neurons
Retinal Ganglion Cells
Dendrites
Ganglia
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Direction selectivity in the retina : Symmetry and asymmetry in structure and function. / Vaney, David I.; Sivyer, Benjamin; Taylor, William.

In: Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Vol. 13, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 194-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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