Differences in physical and mental health symptoms and mental health utilization associated with intimate-partner violence versus childhood abuse

Christina Nicolaidis, Bentson McFarland, Mary Ann Curry, Martha Gerrity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: There is ample evidence that both intimate-partner violence (IPV) and childhood abuse adversely affect the physical and mental health of adult women over the long term. Objective: The authors assessed the associations between abuse, symptoms, and mental health utilization. Method: The authors performed a cross-sectional survey of 380 adult female, internal-medicine patients. Results: Although both IPV and childhood abuse were associated with depressive and physical symptoms, IPV was independently associated with physical symptoms, and childhood abuse was independently associated with depression. Women with a history of childhood abuse had higher odds, whereas women with IPV had lower odds, of receiving care from mental health providers. Conclusion: IPV and childhood abuse may have different effects on women's symptoms and mental health utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-346
Number of pages7
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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