Differences in diabetes mellitus onset for older black, white, and mexican americans

Ana Quinones, Jersey Liang, Wen Ye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Our research examines the differ- ences in estimated odds of developing diabetes mellitus forWhite, Black, and Mexican Americans age 51 and over for a period of 11 years. Design, Setting, and Participants: Longitudinal data came from 14,783 respondents of the Health and Retirement Study (1995-2006) who reported being diabetes-free at the first time period. Discrete-time survival models were used to analyze ethnic variations in the probability of developing diabetes. Main Outcome Measure: Estimated odds of developing diabetes mellitus. Results: The odds of newly diagnosed diabetes increased between 1995 and 2006, with 11% cumulative incidence for all study participants. The probability of incident diabetes among Black Americans was .01 during the period of 1995/96- 1998, which increased to .03 during 1998-2000 and remained at .03 throughout subsequent periods, with cumulative incidence over the 11 years at 12%. In contrast, for Mexican Americans the probability more than doubled from .02 in 1995/ 96-1998 to .05 in 2004-2006, with cumulative incidence at 19%. White Americans had 11% cumulative incidence during the 11 year period. Conclusions: Relative to White Americans, Mexican Americans had significantly elevated odds of developing diabetes throughout the 11-year period of observation even after controlling for differences in demographic, socioeconomic, and time-varying health characteristics. (Ethn Dis. 2013;23[3]:310-315).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-315
Number of pages6
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus incidence
  • Discrete-time survival analysis
  • Ethnic differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Differences in diabetes mellitus onset for older black, white, and mexican americans. / Quinones, Ana; Liang, Jersey; Ye, Wen.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 23, No. 3, 06.2013, p. 310-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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