Diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin resuscitation of hemorrhage: Comparison of a blood substitute with hypertonic saline and isotonic saline

S. M. Cohn, T. J. Farrell, J. W. Holcroft, Richard Mullins, A. G. Greenburg, D. G. Burris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Resuscitation with tiny volumes of hypertonic solutions rapidly restores tissue perfusion while minimizing edema after hemorrhage and tissue trauma. Methods: We compared an O2-carrying fluid, Diaspirin Cross-Linked Hemoglobin (DCLHb), to 7.5% NS/Dextran-70 (HTS) or 0.9% saline (NS) in a trauma (celiotomy) hemorrhage model. Anesthetized rats (n = 10/group) underwent a tracheotomy, placement of jugular vein and carotid artery catheters, and placement of an abdominal aortic flow probe. Rats were hemorrhaged (20 mL/kg) from t = 0-15 minutes, and were given NS (group I), 60 mL/kg, HTS (group II), 4 mL/kg, or DCLHb (group III), 4 mL/kg, from t = 15-30 minutes. Sampling mandated removal of an additional 10 mL/kg of blood during the 2-hour experiment. Results: Mean arterial pressure was restored after hemorrhage in all groups. Oxygen delivery, which diminished dramatically after hemorrhage, was less than baseline in all groups after resuscitation. Oxygen consumption was restored in all groups after a sharp decrease during hemorrhage. Base deficit increased in the all groups but was greatest after normal saline or hypertonic saline resuscitation (t = 120 minutes; I = 12 ± 0.4*, II = 13 ± 0.5* c, III = 10 ± 0.1*; * = p <0.05 versus baseline value within group for groups I, II, and III; c = p <0.05 group versus DCLHb (group II), by ANOVA). Conclusion: DCLHb restored mean arterial pressure and ameliorated the development of flow-dependent oxygen consumption. Base deficit, a reflection of systemic oxygen debt, was minimized with this blood substitute. DCLHb may represent a superior small volume resuscitative fluid after trauma and hemorrhage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-217
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blood Substitutes
Resuscitation
Hemorrhage
Oxygen Consumption
Arterial Pressure
Wounds and Injuries
Oxygen
Hypertonic Solutions
Tracheotomy
Jugular Veins
Dextrans
Carotid Arteries
diaspirin-cross-linked hemoglobin
Edema
Analysis of Variance
Catheters
Perfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin resuscitation of hemorrhage : Comparison of a blood substitute with hypertonic saline and isotonic saline. / Cohn, S. M.; Farrell, T. J.; Holcroft, J. W.; Mullins, Richard; Greenburg, A. G.; Burris, D. G.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 39, No. 2, 1995, p. 210-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b4fdf2751b114719ac5c0c0b890c6690,
title = "Diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin resuscitation of hemorrhage: Comparison of a blood substitute with hypertonic saline and isotonic saline",
abstract = "Resuscitation with tiny volumes of hypertonic solutions rapidly restores tissue perfusion while minimizing edema after hemorrhage and tissue trauma. Methods: We compared an O2-carrying fluid, Diaspirin Cross-Linked Hemoglobin (DCLHb), to 7.5{\%} NS/Dextran-70 (HTS) or 0.9{\%} saline (NS) in a trauma (celiotomy) hemorrhage model. Anesthetized rats (n = 10/group) underwent a tracheotomy, placement of jugular vein and carotid artery catheters, and placement of an abdominal aortic flow probe. Rats were hemorrhaged (20 mL/kg) from t = 0-15 minutes, and were given NS (group I), 60 mL/kg, HTS (group II), 4 mL/kg, or DCLHb (group III), 4 mL/kg, from t = 15-30 minutes. Sampling mandated removal of an additional 10 mL/kg of blood during the 2-hour experiment. Results: Mean arterial pressure was restored after hemorrhage in all groups. Oxygen delivery, which diminished dramatically after hemorrhage, was less than baseline in all groups after resuscitation. Oxygen consumption was restored in all groups after a sharp decrease during hemorrhage. Base deficit increased in the all groups but was greatest after normal saline or hypertonic saline resuscitation (t = 120 minutes; I = 12 ± 0.4*, II = 13 ± 0.5* c, III = 10 ± 0.1*; * = p <0.05 versus baseline value within group for groups I, II, and III; c = p <0.05 group versus DCLHb (group II), by ANOVA). Conclusion: DCLHb restored mean arterial pressure and ameliorated the development of flow-dependent oxygen consumption. Base deficit, a reflection of systemic oxygen debt, was minimized with this blood substitute. DCLHb may represent a superior small volume resuscitative fluid after trauma and hemorrhage.",
author = "Cohn, {S. M.} and Farrell, {T. J.} and Holcroft, {J. W.} and Richard Mullins and Greenburg, {A. G.} and Burris, {D. G.}",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1097/00005373-199508000-00005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "210--217",
journal = "Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery",
issn = "2163-0755",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin resuscitation of hemorrhage

T2 - Comparison of a blood substitute with hypertonic saline and isotonic saline

AU - Cohn, S. M.

AU - Farrell, T. J.

AU - Holcroft, J. W.

AU - Mullins, Richard

AU - Greenburg, A. G.

AU - Burris, D. G.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Resuscitation with tiny volumes of hypertonic solutions rapidly restores tissue perfusion while minimizing edema after hemorrhage and tissue trauma. Methods: We compared an O2-carrying fluid, Diaspirin Cross-Linked Hemoglobin (DCLHb), to 7.5% NS/Dextran-70 (HTS) or 0.9% saline (NS) in a trauma (celiotomy) hemorrhage model. Anesthetized rats (n = 10/group) underwent a tracheotomy, placement of jugular vein and carotid artery catheters, and placement of an abdominal aortic flow probe. Rats were hemorrhaged (20 mL/kg) from t = 0-15 minutes, and were given NS (group I), 60 mL/kg, HTS (group II), 4 mL/kg, or DCLHb (group III), 4 mL/kg, from t = 15-30 minutes. Sampling mandated removal of an additional 10 mL/kg of blood during the 2-hour experiment. Results: Mean arterial pressure was restored after hemorrhage in all groups. Oxygen delivery, which diminished dramatically after hemorrhage, was less than baseline in all groups after resuscitation. Oxygen consumption was restored in all groups after a sharp decrease during hemorrhage. Base deficit increased in the all groups but was greatest after normal saline or hypertonic saline resuscitation (t = 120 minutes; I = 12 ± 0.4*, II = 13 ± 0.5* c, III = 10 ± 0.1*; * = p <0.05 versus baseline value within group for groups I, II, and III; c = p <0.05 group versus DCLHb (group II), by ANOVA). Conclusion: DCLHb restored mean arterial pressure and ameliorated the development of flow-dependent oxygen consumption. Base deficit, a reflection of systemic oxygen debt, was minimized with this blood substitute. DCLHb may represent a superior small volume resuscitative fluid after trauma and hemorrhage.

AB - Resuscitation with tiny volumes of hypertonic solutions rapidly restores tissue perfusion while minimizing edema after hemorrhage and tissue trauma. Methods: We compared an O2-carrying fluid, Diaspirin Cross-Linked Hemoglobin (DCLHb), to 7.5% NS/Dextran-70 (HTS) or 0.9% saline (NS) in a trauma (celiotomy) hemorrhage model. Anesthetized rats (n = 10/group) underwent a tracheotomy, placement of jugular vein and carotid artery catheters, and placement of an abdominal aortic flow probe. Rats were hemorrhaged (20 mL/kg) from t = 0-15 minutes, and were given NS (group I), 60 mL/kg, HTS (group II), 4 mL/kg, or DCLHb (group III), 4 mL/kg, from t = 15-30 minutes. Sampling mandated removal of an additional 10 mL/kg of blood during the 2-hour experiment. Results: Mean arterial pressure was restored after hemorrhage in all groups. Oxygen delivery, which diminished dramatically after hemorrhage, was less than baseline in all groups after resuscitation. Oxygen consumption was restored in all groups after a sharp decrease during hemorrhage. Base deficit increased in the all groups but was greatest after normal saline or hypertonic saline resuscitation (t = 120 minutes; I = 12 ± 0.4*, II = 13 ± 0.5* c, III = 10 ± 0.1*; * = p <0.05 versus baseline value within group for groups I, II, and III; c = p <0.05 group versus DCLHb (group II), by ANOVA). Conclusion: DCLHb restored mean arterial pressure and ameliorated the development of flow-dependent oxygen consumption. Base deficit, a reflection of systemic oxygen debt, was minimized with this blood substitute. DCLHb may represent a superior small volume resuscitative fluid after trauma and hemorrhage.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029026856&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029026856&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00005373-199508000-00005

DO - 10.1097/00005373-199508000-00005

M3 - Article

C2 - 7674387

AN - SCOPUS:0029026856

VL - 39

SP - 210

EP - 217

JO - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

JF - Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

SN - 2163-0755

IS - 2

ER -