Developmental psychopathology, personality, and temperament: Reflections on recent behavioral genetics research

Joel Nigg, H. Hill Goldsmith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Personality, temperament, and psychopathology were until recently largely distinct areas of study, each of which emphasized partitioning of heritable and environmental variance. The emergence of the paradigm of developmental psychopathology along with application of multivariate biometric models to behavioral genetic data has defined a second phase of research in these domains. Integrated research has begun to map dimensional liability-threshold models of psychopathology and to evaluate empirically the categorical versus dimensional etiology of traits and disorders. An interesting pattern in the data is that psychopathology is probably not merely an extreme of temperament or personality in many cases. Variations in temperament and personality are now known to be heavily influenced by additive genetic and nonshared environmental factors and to exhibit stable or increasing heritability across development. This pattern holds for some measures of psychopathology but not for others. For example, shared environment effects and decreasing heritability influence much adolescent psychopathology, and comorbid problems in young children appear to be due in part to shared environment effects. Other recent biometric work on the central problem of comorbidity in psychopathology suggests that shared genetic covariation accounts for some specific comorbidities but not others. A third phase of research is now underway, featuring study of specific molecular gene mechanisms by means of linkage and association studies in relation to behavioral phenotypes. Complementary integration of discoveries from biometric behavioral studies and molecular studies is expected to be the norm for the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-412
Number of pages26
JournalHuman Biology
Volume70
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Behavioral Genetics
Behavioral Research
Genetic Research
temperament
Temperament
biometry
Psychopathology
Personality
heritability
etiology
liability
linkage (genetics)
phenotype
environmental factor
partitioning
Comorbidity
Research
environmental factors
gene
genes

Keywords

  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • Comorbidity
  • Personality
  • Psychopathology
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Developmental psychopathology, personality, and temperament : Reflections on recent behavioral genetics research. / Nigg, Joel; Goldsmith, H. Hill.

In: Human Biology, Vol. 70, No. 2, 1998, p. 387-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{68d2fc6c148e40fb8c730d46915be616,
title = "Developmental psychopathology, personality, and temperament: Reflections on recent behavioral genetics research",
abstract = "Personality, temperament, and psychopathology were until recently largely distinct areas of study, each of which emphasized partitioning of heritable and environmental variance. The emergence of the paradigm of developmental psychopathology along with application of multivariate biometric models to behavioral genetic data has defined a second phase of research in these domains. Integrated research has begun to map dimensional liability-threshold models of psychopathology and to evaluate empirically the categorical versus dimensional etiology of traits and disorders. An interesting pattern in the data is that psychopathology is probably not merely an extreme of temperament or personality in many cases. Variations in temperament and personality are now known to be heavily influenced by additive genetic and nonshared environmental factors and to exhibit stable or increasing heritability across development. This pattern holds for some measures of psychopathology but not for others. For example, shared environment effects and decreasing heritability influence much adolescent psychopathology, and comorbid problems in young children appear to be due in part to shared environment effects. Other recent biometric work on the central problem of comorbidity in psychopathology suggests that shared genetic covariation accounts for some specific comorbidities but not others. A third phase of research is now underway, featuring study of specific molecular gene mechanisms by means of linkage and association studies in relation to behavioral phenotypes. Complementary integration of discoveries from biometric behavioral studies and molecular studies is expected to be the norm for the near future.",
keywords = "Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Comorbidity, Personality, Psychopathology, Temperament",
author = "Joel Nigg and Goldsmith, {H. Hill}",
year = "1998",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "387--412",
journal = "Human Biology",
issn = "0018-7143",
publisher = "Wayne State University Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developmental psychopathology, personality, and temperament

T2 - Reflections on recent behavioral genetics research

AU - Nigg, Joel

AU - Goldsmith, H. Hill

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - Personality, temperament, and psychopathology were until recently largely distinct areas of study, each of which emphasized partitioning of heritable and environmental variance. The emergence of the paradigm of developmental psychopathology along with application of multivariate biometric models to behavioral genetic data has defined a second phase of research in these domains. Integrated research has begun to map dimensional liability-threshold models of psychopathology and to evaluate empirically the categorical versus dimensional etiology of traits and disorders. An interesting pattern in the data is that psychopathology is probably not merely an extreme of temperament or personality in many cases. Variations in temperament and personality are now known to be heavily influenced by additive genetic and nonshared environmental factors and to exhibit stable or increasing heritability across development. This pattern holds for some measures of psychopathology but not for others. For example, shared environment effects and decreasing heritability influence much adolescent psychopathology, and comorbid problems in young children appear to be due in part to shared environment effects. Other recent biometric work on the central problem of comorbidity in psychopathology suggests that shared genetic covariation accounts for some specific comorbidities but not others. A third phase of research is now underway, featuring study of specific molecular gene mechanisms by means of linkage and association studies in relation to behavioral phenotypes. Complementary integration of discoveries from biometric behavioral studies and molecular studies is expected to be the norm for the near future.

AB - Personality, temperament, and psychopathology were until recently largely distinct areas of study, each of which emphasized partitioning of heritable and environmental variance. The emergence of the paradigm of developmental psychopathology along with application of multivariate biometric models to behavioral genetic data has defined a second phase of research in these domains. Integrated research has begun to map dimensional liability-threshold models of psychopathology and to evaluate empirically the categorical versus dimensional etiology of traits and disorders. An interesting pattern in the data is that psychopathology is probably not merely an extreme of temperament or personality in many cases. Variations in temperament and personality are now known to be heavily influenced by additive genetic and nonshared environmental factors and to exhibit stable or increasing heritability across development. This pattern holds for some measures of psychopathology but not for others. For example, shared environment effects and decreasing heritability influence much adolescent psychopathology, and comorbid problems in young children appear to be due in part to shared environment effects. Other recent biometric work on the central problem of comorbidity in psychopathology suggests that shared genetic covariation accounts for some specific comorbidities but not others. A third phase of research is now underway, featuring study of specific molecular gene mechanisms by means of linkage and association studies in relation to behavioral phenotypes. Complementary integration of discoveries from biometric behavioral studies and molecular studies is expected to be the norm for the near future.

KW - Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Personality

KW - Psychopathology

KW - Temperament

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032055659&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032055659&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9549245

AN - SCOPUS:0032055659

VL - 70

SP - 387

EP - 412

JO - Human Biology

JF - Human Biology

SN - 0018-7143

IS - 2

ER -