DESPAIR, DISTRUST AND DISSATISFACTION AMONG BLACKS AND WOMEN, 1973–1987

Roy L. Austin, Hiroko Hayama Dodge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Discontent among American blacks and women is examined with indicators of the anomia of despair and distrust, and of job and financial dissatisfaction. Nine years of General Social Survey data covering 1973 through 1987 show that blacks’ discontent exceeds whites’ in most instances examined; and black women more frequently show significantly higher discontent than other race/gender groups. Also, blacks’ discontent more often exceeds whites’ among persons high in SES than among those low in SES. But gender main effects are almost nonexistent; and white women almost never show more discontent than other race/gender groups. This unexpected finding may be related to white women's greater identification with race than gender and their perception of general but not personal discrimination. Failure of the gender/discontent relationships to differ with the American president in office may have a similar explanation. But, as expected, racial differences in discontent tended to be higher during the Nixon/Ford and Reagan administrations than Carter's.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)579-598
Number of pages20
JournalSociological Quarterly
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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