Description, normative data, and utility of the hearing aid skills and knowledge test

Gabrielle Saunders, Charlotte Morse-Fortier, Daniel J. McDermott, Jay J. Vachhani, Leslie D. Grush, Susan Griest, M. Samantha Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The ability to manage hearing AIDS is crucial for successful outcomes and for maintaining hearing aid use. It is therefore important to have a tool that can effectively identify which hearing aid management skills are lacking so that the audiologist can provide additional education and training on that skill. Such a tool can also provide useful quantitative data for researchers. Purpose: To collect normative data (Experiment 1) and assess inter- and intrarater reliability (Experiment 2) for a hearing aid management assessment tool known as the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge (HASK) test. Study Sample: Two hundred thirty-six new hearing aid users recruited from the VA Portland Health Care System and 126 experienced hearing aid users recruited from the local Portland community participated in Experiment 1. The veteran participants were taking part in a larger hearing aid study, and the community participants were recruited at community events that took place around Portland, OR. Three clinical audiologists and two AuD students completing their fourth year externship participated in Experiment 2. Data Collection and Analysis: In Experiment 1, HASK data were collected from the new hearing aid users at 4-8 wk and 6-8 mo after the fitting of their first pair of hearing AIDS, and from experienced users on a single occasion. In addition, self-reported hearing aid use, benefit, and satisfaction were assessed for all participants. The audiologists/students in Experiment 2 watched and independently scored videos of six individuals completing the HASK. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) across audiologists were computed for HASK scores. Three audiologists/students rated at least one video on two occasions to provide interrater reliability data. Results: Mean performance on the HASK was about 70% for knowledge and 80% for skills for both the new and experienced hearing aid users. Performance did not change among the new users between the 4-8 wk and 6-8 mo administration. The specific skills lacking were associated with advanced management abilities (cleaning and troubleshooting). Experiment 2 revealed ICCs for inter- and intrarater reliability for HASK to range from 0.76 to 0.94, showing acceptable to excellent reliability. Conclusions: The HASK is a quick and easy test with good-to-excellent inter- and intrarater reliability. It can effectively identify which hearing aid management skills are lacking so that the audiologist can pro- vide additional education and training on those skills. Data show performance isz70% for knowledge and 80% for skills and this does not change with hearing aid experience. The significant positive correlations between HASK scores and hearing aid use and satisfaction highlight the notion that ability to manage hearing AIDS successfully is integral to good hearing aid outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-242
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • Hearing aid management
  • Hearing AIDS
  • Hearing loss
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing

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    Saunders, G., Morse-Fortier, C., McDermott, D. J., Vachhani, J. J., Grush, L. D., Griest, S., & Lewis, M. S. (2018). Description, normative data, and utility of the hearing aid skills and knowledge test. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 29(3), 233-242. https://doi.org/10.3766/jaaa.16153