Dental Stem Cells and Their Sources

Christine Sedgley, Tatiana M. Botero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The search for more accessible mesenchymal stem cells than those found in bone marrow has propelled interest in dental tissues. Human dental stem/progenitor cells (collectively termed dental stem cells [DSCs]) that have been isolated and characterized include dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla, periodontal ligament stem cells, and dental follicle progenitor cells. Common characteristics of these cell populations are the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. In vitro and animal studies have shown that DSCs can differentiate into osseous, odontogenic, adipose, endothelial, and neural-like tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-561
Number of pages13
JournalDental Clinics of North America
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Fingerprint

Tooth
Stem Cells
Dental Sac
Dental Pulp
Periodontal Ligament
Deciduous Tooth
Population Characteristics
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Bone Marrow

Keywords

  • Dental follicle precursor cells (DFPCs)
  • Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs)
  • Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs)
  • Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED cells)
  • Stem cells from root apical papilla (SCAP cells)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Dental Stem Cells and Their Sources. / Sedgley, Christine; Botero, Tatiana M.

In: Dental Clinics of North America, Vol. 56, No. 3, 07.2012, p. 549-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sedgley, Christine ; Botero, Tatiana M. / Dental Stem Cells and Their Sources. In: Dental Clinics of North America. 2012 ; Vol. 56, No. 3. pp. 549-561.
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