Dementia in rural primary care practices in Lake County, Oregon

R. Camicioli, P. Willert, J. Lear, S. Grossmann, Jeffrey Kaye, P. Butterfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Procedures used in assessing patients with dementia in rural settings are little studied. Among all patients aged 65 years and older in the four primary care practices in Lake County, Oregon, dementia cases were identified from computerized office databases using preselected International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, codes. A semi-structured chart review determined (1) a dementia diagnosis, (2) cognitive and functional domains assessed, and (3) diagnostic studies performed. Of 1540 available records, 30 had dementia. Nineteen of them met National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke-Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cognitive impairment was documented in 73% of the 51 identified charts and all with AD. Laboratory studies were recorded in 33% overall and in 42% with AD. Neuroimaging was documented in 18% overall and in 16% with AD. The prevalence of documented dementia in these rural practices may be low, possibly because cases of mild dementia may not be labeled as such. Laboratory studies were performed in a minority of cases of dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume13
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2000

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Dementia
Primary Health Care
Alzheimer Disease
International Classification of Diseases
Neuroimaging
Stroke
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Camicioli, R., Willert, P., Lear, J., Grossmann, S., Kaye, J., & Butterfield, P. (2000). Dementia in rural primary care practices in Lake County, Oregon. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 13(2), 87-92.

Dementia in rural primary care practices in Lake County, Oregon. / Camicioli, R.; Willert, P.; Lear, J.; Grossmann, S.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Butterfield, P.

In: Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2000, p. 87-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Camicioli, R, Willert, P, Lear, J, Grossmann, S, Kaye, J & Butterfield, P 2000, 'Dementia in rural primary care practices in Lake County, Oregon', Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 87-92.
Camicioli R, Willert P, Lear J, Grossmann S, Kaye J, Butterfield P. Dementia in rural primary care practices in Lake County, Oregon. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology. 2000;13(2):87-92.
Camicioli, R. ; Willert, P. ; Lear, J. ; Grossmann, S. ; Kaye, Jeffrey ; Butterfield, P. / Dementia in rural primary care practices in Lake County, Oregon. In: Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology. 2000 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 87-92.
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