Delivery of therapeutics to the inner ear

The challenge of the blood-labyrinth barrier

Sophie Nyberg, N. Joan Abbott, Xiao Shi, Peter Steyger, Alain Dabdoub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Permanent hearing loss affects more than 5% of the world’s population, yet there are no nondevice therapies that can protect or restore hearing. Delivery of therapeutics to the cochlea and vestibular system of the inner ear is complicated by their inaccessible location. Drug delivery to the inner ear via the vasculature is an attractive noninvasive strategy, yet the blood-labyrinth barrier at the luminal surface of inner ear capillaries restricts entry of most blood-borne compounds into inner ear tissues. Here, we compare the blood-labyrinth barrier to the blood-brain barrier, discuss invasive intratympanic and intracochlear drug delivery methods, and evaluate noninvasive strategies for drug delivery to the inner ear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbereaao0935
JournalScience Translational Medicine
Volume11
Issue number482
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Inner Ear
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cochlea
Blood-Brain Barrier
Hearing Loss
Hearing
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Delivery of therapeutics to the inner ear : The challenge of the blood-labyrinth barrier. / Nyberg, Sophie; Joan Abbott, N.; Shi, Xiao; Steyger, Peter; Dabdoub, Alain.

In: Science Translational Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 482, eaao0935, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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