Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) as an endocrine marker of aging in calorie restriction studies

Henryk Urbanski, Julie A. Mattison, George S. Roth, Donald K. Ingram

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    The adrenal steroid, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), is generally regarded as being a reliable endocrine marker of aging, because in humans and nonhuman primates its circulating concentrations are very high during young adulthood, and the concentrations then decline markedly during aging. Despite promising results from early studies, we were recently surprised to find that caloric restriction (CR) did little to prevent or delay the decline of DHEAS concentrations in old rhesus macaques. Here we summarize the use of circulating DHEAS concentrations as a biomarker of aging in CR studies and suggest reasons for its limited value. Although DHEAS can reliably predict aging in animals maintained on a standard diet, dietary manipulations may affect liver enzymes involved in the metabolism of steroid hormones. Consequently, in CR studies the reliability of using DHEAS as a biomarker of aging may be compromised.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1136-1139
    Number of pages4
    JournalExperimental Gerontology
    Volume48
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

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    Keywords

    • Adrenal gland
    • Biomarker
    • Cortisol
    • DHEAS
    • Rhesus macaque

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Aging
    • Biochemistry
    • Cell Biology
    • Endocrinology
    • Genetics
    • Molecular Biology

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