Deep-seated, well differentiated lipomatous tumors of the chest wall and extremities: The role of cytogenetics in classification and prognostication

Mikelle D. Bassett, Scott M. Schuetze, Christine Disteche, Thomas H. Norwood, Karen Swisshelm, Xiaoqin Chen, James Bruckner, Ernest U. Conrad, Brian P. Rubin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Intramuscular lipomas and atypical lipomatous tumors (ALT) are common deep-seated lipomatous tumors of the chest wall and extremities. Distinguishing between these two entities can be difficult based on histologic analysis alone. However, the cytogenetic profiles of ALT and intramuscular lipomas are distinct. Correct classification is important, because aggressive local disease recurrence occurs more frequently in patients with ALT than in patients with intramuscular lipoma. The authors examined their single institutional experience and correlated their classification with clinical features and outcome. METHODS. In the current study, 106 patients with deep-seated, well differentiated adipose tumors of the chest wall and extremities were classified as having ALT or intramuscular lipoma using a combined approach of histology and cytogenetics, if available. The classification was correlated with clinicopathologic features and follow-up data. RESULTS. Fifty-five patients were classified as having intramuscular lipoma and 51 were classified as having ALT. Classification did not correlate with age and gender (P = 0.28 and P = 0.96, respectively). Intramuscular lipomas were smaller than ALTs (P < 0.0001), but there was significant overlap between the 2 groups. ALT occurred preferentially in the lower extremity (P < 0.0009). Four percent of patients with intramuscular lipomas and 27% of patients with ALTs developed local disease recurrence (P = 0.0006). Disease recurrence did not correlate with patient age at diagnosis, patient gender, tumor size, and tumor location (P = 0.45, P = 0.26, P = 0.49, and P = 0.28, respectively). Within the subset of patients with ALTs, disease recurrence did not correlate with patient age at diagnosis, patient gender, or tumor location (P = 0.38, P = 0.54, and P = 0.86, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. Classification of deep-seated, well differentiated lipomatous tumors of the extremities and chest wall using a combined approach of histology and cytogenetics correlated well with biologic behavior/disease recurrence. This combined approach is advocated to better stratify patients for treatment purposes and follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-416
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume103
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2005

Keywords

  • Atypical lipomatous tumor
  • Cytogenetics
  • Intramuscular lipoma
  • Well differentiated liposarcoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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    Bassett, M. D., Schuetze, S. M., Disteche, C., Norwood, T. H., Swisshelm, K., Chen, X., Bruckner, J., Conrad, E. U., & Rubin, B. P. (2005). Deep-seated, well differentiated lipomatous tumors of the chest wall and extremities: The role of cytogenetics in classification and prognostication. Cancer, 103(2), 409-416. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20779