Deducing the organization of a transmembrane domain by disulfide cross- linking. The bacterial chemoreceptor Trg

G. F. Lee, G. G. Burrows, M. R. Lebert, D. P. Dutton, G. L. Hazelbauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

99 Scopus citations

Abstract

The transmembrane domain of chemoreceptor Trg from Escherichia coli contains four segments, two from each subunit of the homodimer. We used site- specific mutagenesis to introduce cysteines into those segments and oxidative cross-linking of cysteine pairs to identify residues that are near each other in space. Propensity for cross-linking was determined for pairs of homologously placed cysteines in the two subunits of the dimer at all 54 possible positions. Also, combinations of cysteines were identified that readily oxidized to join heterologous segments within or between monomers. These patterns of cross-linking were used to develop a model for the three- dimensional structure of the transmembrane domain in which the four transmembrane segments are helices associated in a bundle, with stronger interactions near the periplasm and weaker interactions near the cytoplasm. The striking similarity of this model to a model for the transmembrane domain of chemoreceptor Tar, derived using the same experimental strategy, strengthens the notion that a combination of comprehensive cysteine substitutions and analysis of patterns of disulfide cross-linking is sufficient to deduce a detailed three-dimensional structure for a transmembrane domain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29920-29927
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume269
Issue number47
StatePublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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