Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010)

Universal Data Collection Joint Outcome Working Group, Hemophilia Treatment Center Network (HTCN) Study Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Recurrent joint hemarthroses due to hemophilia (Factor VIII and Factor IX deficiency) often lead to invasive orthopedic interventions to decrease frequency of bleeding and/or to alleviate pain associated with end-stage hemophilic arthropathy. Aim: Identify trends in invasive orthopedic interventions among people with hemophilia who were enrolled in the Universal Data Collection (UDC) program during the period 2000–2010. Methods: Data were collected from 130 hemophilia treatment centers in the United States annually during the period 2000–2010, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The number of visits in which an invasive orthopedic intervention was reported was expressed as a proportion of the total visits in each year of the program. Invasive orthopedic interventions consisted of arthroplasty, arthrodesis, and synovectomy. Joints included in this study were the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle. Results: A 5.6% decrease in all invasive orthopedic interventions in all joints of people with hemophilia enrolled in the UDC program over the 11-year study period was observed. Conclusions: These data reflect a declining trend in invasive orthopedic interventions in people with hemophilia. Further research is needed to understand the characteristics that may influence invasive orthopedic interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)604-614
Number of pages11
JournalHaemophilia
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Hemophilia A
Orthopedics
Joints
Hemarthrosis
Hemophilia B
Joint Diseases
Arthrodesis
Factor VIII
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Elbow
Ankle
Arthroplasty
Hip
Knee
Hemorrhage
Pain
Research

Keywords

  • arthropathy
  • arthroplasty
  • hemophilia
  • orthopedic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Universal Data Collection Joint Outcome Working Group, Hemophilia Treatment Center Network (HTCN) Study Investigators (2016). Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010). Haemophilia, 22(4), 604-614. https://doi.org/10.1111/hae.12932

Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010). / Universal Data Collection Joint Outcome Working Group, Hemophilia Treatment Center Network (HTCN) Study Investigators.

In: Haemophilia, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.07.2016, p. 604-614.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Universal Data Collection Joint Outcome Working Group, Hemophilia Treatment Center Network (HTCN) Study Investigators 2016, 'Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010)', Haemophilia, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 604-614. https://doi.org/10.1111/hae.12932
Universal Data Collection Joint Outcome Working Group, Hemophilia Treatment Center Network (HTCN) Study Investigators. Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010). Haemophilia. 2016 Jul 1;22(4):604-614. https://doi.org/10.1111/hae.12932
Universal Data Collection Joint Outcome Working Group, Hemophilia Treatment Center Network (HTCN) Study Investigators. / Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010). In: Haemophilia. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 604-614.
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