Daily cannabis use is associated with sleep duration differentially across ages

Joshua E. Gonzalez, Steven Shea, Nicole P. Bowles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess the relationship between frequency of cannabis use and sleep duration across age in a large US population (235,667 people). Methods: Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between the frequency of cannabis use and sleep duration using cross sectional data from the 2016-2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Results: When adjusted for sociodemographic factors, health related variables, and stratified by age we found that young adults (18-44 years) who reported daily-use (≥16 uses a month) had an increased risk ratio (RR [95% CI]) for either short or long sleep (1.22 [1.06-1.40] and 1.52 [1.07-2.16]); midlife adults (45-64 years) who reported daily-use had an increased prevalence of long sleep (1.71 [1.03-2.82]); and older adults (≥65 years) who reported daily-use had an increased prevalence of short sleep (1.61 [1.05-2.49]). Conclusions: Compared to those who reported no cannabis use, individuals who reported daily cannabis use demonstrated a greater prevalence for either short or long sleep duration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSleep health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cannabinoid
  • Disturbed sleep
  • Marijuana

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Daily cannabis use is associated with sleep duration differentially across ages'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this