Cytomegalovirus serologic matching in deceased donor kidney allocation optimizes high- and low-risk (D+R− and D−R−) profiles and does not adversely affect transplant rates

Joe Lockridge, Daniel Roberts, Ali Olyaei, Brie N. Noble, Eric Langewisch, Shehzad Rehman, Megan Stack, David Scott, Susan Orloff, Carley Shaut, Brent Gardner, William Bennett, Douglas Norman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a major cause of infection-related morbidity and mortality in kidney transplantation. The most significant risk for developing CMV infection after transplant depends upon donor (D) and recipient (R) CMV serostatus. In 2012, our Organ Procurement Organization (OPO) began a novel pretransplant CMV prevention strategy via matching deceased kidney donors and recipients by CMV serostatus. Prior to the matching protocol, our distribution of seropositive and seronegative donors and recipients was similar to the United States at large. After the matching protocol, high-risk D+R− were reduced from 18.5% to 2.9%, whereas low-risk D−R− were increased from 13.5% to 24%. There was no adverse effect on transplant rates and no differential effect on waiting times for R+ vs R− after the protocol was implemented. This protocol could be implemented on a regional or national level to optimize low and high-risk CMV seroprofiles and potentially improve CMV-related outcomes in kidney transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • antibiotic prophylaxis
  • clinical research/practice
  • health services and outcomes research
  • infection and infectious agents – viral: Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
  • infectious disease
  • kidney transplantation/nephrology
  • organ allocation
  • organ procurement and allocation
  • waitlist management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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