Current and future AAC research considerations for adults with acquired cognitive and communication impairments

Melanie Fried-Oken, David R. Beukelman, Karen Hux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adults with acquired language impairments secondary to stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative diseases are candidates for communication supports outside of the traditional restoration-based approaches to intervention. Recent research proves repeatedly that augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) provides a means for participation, engagement, conversation, and message transfer when individuals can no longer expect full return of pre-morbid communication skills and that inclusion of communication supports should begin early. We discuss current research and future directions for integrated systems of technical supports that include low-technology, high tech, and partner-dependent strategies for adults with severe and chronic aphasia, cognitive-communication problems resulting from traumatic brain injuries, and primary progressive aphasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-66
Number of pages11
JournalAssistive Technology
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Fingerprint

Communication
Research
Primary Progressive Aphasia
Aphasia
Brain Diseases
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Language
Stroke
Cognitive Dysfunction
Technology
Traumatic Brain Injury

Keywords

  • acquired disabilities
  • aphasia
  • augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)
  • cognition
  • dementia
  • primary progressive aphasia
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Current and future AAC research considerations for adults with acquired cognitive and communication impairments. / Fried-Oken, Melanie; Beukelman, David R.; Hux, Karen.

In: Assistive Technology, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.03.2012, p. 56-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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