Current and future AAC research considerations for adults with acquired cognitive and communication impairments

Melanie Fried-Oken, David R. Beukelman, Karen Hux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adults with acquired language impairments secondary to stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative diseases are candidates for communication supports outside of the traditional restoration-based approaches to intervention. Recent research proves repeatedly that augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) provides a means for participation, engagement, conversation, and message transfer when individuals can no longer expect full return of pre-morbid communication skills and that inclusion of communication supports should begin early. We discuss current research and future directions for integrated systems of technical supports that include low-technology, high tech, and partner-dependent strategies for adults with severe and chronic aphasia, cognitive-communication problems resulting from traumatic brain injuries, and primary progressive aphasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-66
Number of pages11
JournalAssistive Technology
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Keywords

  • acquired disabilities
  • aphasia
  • augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)
  • cognition
  • dementia
  • primary progressive aphasia
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Current and future AAC research considerations for adults with acquired cognitive and communication impairments'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this