CSF prolactin determination in patients following operation for pituitary tumor.

R. M. Jordan, John Kendall, S. D. McDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma prolactin concentrations were determined from patients during prolactin stimulatory testing with thyrotropin-releasing hormone or during pneumoencephalographic stress. Six patients had been operated on for suprasellar extension of pituitary tumor and one had been irradiated for suprasellar extension of a pituitary tumor. Prior to testing, four patients had had no clinical evidence of tumor recurrence and 3 patients had had tumor recurrence. One of the recurrent tumors had again extended into a suprasellar location. Basal CSF prolactin was undetectable in all patients who had had no recurrence. In 3 of the 4 patients without recurrence, however, prolactin became detectable in CSF during stimulatory testing. CSF prolactin values also increased during stimulatory testing in the patient with suprasellar recurrence of the tumor. A basal CSF-to-plasma prolactin ratio was 0.1 or less in all patients without recurrence. In the 2 patients with recurrence but without suprasellar extension, the CSF-to-plasma prolactin ratio was 0.18 or less. The patient with suprasellar recurrence had a strikingly elevated CSF-to-plasma prolactin ratio of 1.1. Thus, an increase of CSF prolactin during stimulatory testing does not necessarily indicate suprasellar recurrence of a pituitary tumor. However, an elevated CSF-to-plasma prolactin ratio appears to remain a valid indicator of suprasellar extension despite prior pituitary surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-391
Number of pages5
JournalSurgical Neurology
Volume14
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pituitary Neoplasms
Prolactin
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Recurrence
Neoplasms
Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Jordan, R. M., Kendall, J., & McDonald, S. D. (1980). CSF prolactin determination in patients following operation for pituitary tumor. Surgical Neurology, 14(5), 387-391.

CSF prolactin determination in patients following operation for pituitary tumor. / Jordan, R. M.; Kendall, John; McDonald, S. D.

In: Surgical Neurology, Vol. 14, No. 5, 11.1980, p. 387-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jordan, RM, Kendall, J & McDonald, SD 1980, 'CSF prolactin determination in patients following operation for pituitary tumor.', Surgical Neurology, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 387-391.
Jordan, R. M. ; Kendall, John ; McDonald, S. D. / CSF prolactin determination in patients following operation for pituitary tumor. In: Surgical Neurology. 1980 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 387-391.
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