Cross cultural study of depressive symptoms in Hawaii

John (Dave) Kinzie, J. Ryals, F. Cottington, J. F. McDermott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using the Zung Self Rating Depression Scale as a measurement of depressive symptoms, 509 University of Hawaii Japanese, Chinese, and Caucasians were tested for prevalence of depression. In the total population 28% were found to have a mild to moderate degree of depressive symptoms and 10.6% moderate to severe depression. The scores were highly related to ethnicity and sex. The Asian (Japanese and Chinese) females had highest prevalence of moderate to severe depression (14.6%) while the Asian males scored highest on the mild to moderate symptoms (36%). Caucasian females scored least for all levels of symptoms. Within the limits of the population, social class, religion, length of residence in Hawaii, position in family or number of siblings were not related to amount of depression. A special high risk group were those female students whose families resided in the neighboring islands (not Oahu). It is hypothesized that the Asian American students, introverted, reserved, deferrential, 'turning toward self' life style, under stress, is exaggerated to produce depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-24
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry
Volume19
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - 1973
Externally publishedYes

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Depression
Students
Asian Americans
Religion
Islands
Social Class
Population
Life Style
Siblings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kinzie, J. D., Ryals, J., Cottington, F., & McDermott, J. F. (1973). Cross cultural study of depressive symptoms in Hawaii. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 19(1-2), 19-24.

Cross cultural study of depressive symptoms in Hawaii. / Kinzie, John (Dave); Ryals, J.; Cottington, F.; McDermott, J. F.

In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, Vol. 19, No. 1-2, 1973, p. 19-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kinzie, JD, Ryals, J, Cottington, F & McDermott, JF 1973, 'Cross cultural study of depressive symptoms in Hawaii', International Journal of Social Psychiatry, vol. 19, no. 1-2, pp. 19-24.
Kinzie, John (Dave) ; Ryals, J. ; Cottington, F. ; McDermott, J. F. / Cross cultural study of depressive symptoms in Hawaii. In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry. 1973 ; Vol. 19, No. 1-2. pp. 19-24.
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