Critical review of lymphomatoid papulosis of the oral cavity with case report

James Sciubba, Nasser Said-Al-Naief, John Fantasia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 60-year-old woman was referred to the Department of Dental Medicine at Long Island Jewish Medical Center for evaluation of multiple lesions of the tongue. She reported a long history of recurrent papular cutaneous eruptions that waxed and waned. A biopsy specimen of one of the cutaneous lesions was diagnosed as lymphomatoid papulosis. Sporadic, recurrent oral ulcers that resolved spontaneously were noted 10 to 14 days before the initial visit. These ulcers had recurred for the past 17 years. The most recent oral lesion was an erythematous, irregular, solitary ulcerated area on the middle third dorsum of tongue. The area quickly enlarged, ultimately developing extensive surface necrosis. Shortly after, a similar lesion on the posterior dorsum of the tongue developed. Biopsy specimens of the former lesion showed numerous, large, atypical, pleomorphic, and hyperchromatic cells with abundant mitoses. The large, atypical cells were immunohistochemically proven to be T lymphocytes. A diagnosis of lymphomatoid papulosis was made. Two weeks later, the tongue lesions had spontaneously and totally resolved. The clinical, histomorphologic, and immunohistochemical features, as well as gene rearrangement studies of this rare entity, are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-204
Number of pages10
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics
Volume90
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lymphomatoid Papulosis
Tongue
Mouth
Oral Ulcer
Biopsy
Skin
Gene Rearrangement
Mitosis
Islands
Ulcer
Tooth
Necrosis
Medicine
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Surgery
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Critical review of lymphomatoid papulosis of the oral cavity with case report. / Sciubba, James; Said-Al-Naief, Nasser; Fantasia, John.

In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics, Vol. 90, No. 2, 08.2000, p. 195-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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