Crisis Management Simulation

Establishing a Dual Neurosurgery and Anesthesia Training Experience

Jeremy Ciporen, Haley Gillham, Michele Noles, Dawn Dillman, Mark Baskerville, Caleb Haley, Donn Spight, Ryan C. Turner, Brandon P. Lucke-Wold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Simulation training has been shown to be an effective teaching tool. Learner management of an intraoperative crisis such as a major cerebrovascular bleed requires effective teamwork, communication, and implementation of key skill sets at appropriate time points. This study establishes a first of a kind simulation experience in a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident (learners) team working together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Using a cadaveric cavernous carotid injury perfusion model, 7 neurosurgery and 6 anesthesia learners, were trained on appropriate vascular injury management using an endonasal endoscopic technique. Learners were evaluated on communication skills, crisis management algorithms, and implementation of appropriate skill sets at the right time. A preanatomic and postanatomic examination and postsimulation survey was administered to neurosurgery learners. Anesthesia learners provided posttraining evaluation through a tailored realism and teaching survey. Neurosurgery learners' anatomic examination score improved from presimulation (33.89%) to postsimulation (86.11%). No significant difference between learner specialties was observed for situation awareness, decision making, communications and teamwork, or leadership evaluations. Learners reported the simulation realistic, beneficial, and highly instructive. Realistic, first of kind, clinical simulation scenarios were presented to a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident team who worked together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Learners were effectively trained on crisis management, the importance of communication, and how to develop algorithms for future implementation in difficult scenarios. Learners were highly satisfied with the simulation training experience and requested that it be integrated more consistently into their residency training programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-70
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Neurosurgery
Anesthesia
Communication
Teaching
Vascular System Injuries
Internship and Residency
Decision Making
Perfusion
Education
Wounds and Injuries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Simulation Training

Keywords

  • anesthesia simulation
  • cavernous carotid injury
  • crisis management
  • neurosurgery simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Crisis Management Simulation : Establishing a Dual Neurosurgery and Anesthesia Training Experience. / Ciporen, Jeremy; Gillham, Haley; Noles, Michele; Dillman, Dawn; Baskerville, Mark; Haley, Caleb; Spight, Donn; Turner, Ryan C.; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.

In: Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 65-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ciporen, Jeremy ; Gillham, Haley ; Noles, Michele ; Dillman, Dawn ; Baskerville, Mark ; Haley, Caleb ; Spight, Donn ; Turner, Ryan C. ; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P. / Crisis Management Simulation : Establishing a Dual Neurosurgery and Anesthesia Training Experience. In: Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 65-70.
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