CRIPA, Olmstead, and the transformation of the Oregon psychiatric security review board

Joseph Bloom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This commentary explores the relationship among the 1999 U.S. Supreme Court Olmstead decision; the Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, in its application of CRIPA (the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Patients Act); and the application of both CRIPA and Olmstead to the question of individuals hospitalized in state mental institutions following commitment from criminal courts. Using Oregon as an example, the commentary illustrates the interplay between state and federal governments as Olmstead and CRIPA are expanded into the realm of criminal court commitments to state facilities and into the arena of community mental health services for deinstitutionalized persons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-389
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
Volume40
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

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Civil Rights
Psychiatry
Supreme Court Decisions
Deinstitutionalization
Community Mental Health Services
State Government
Federal Government
Social Justice
Psychiatric Hospitals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

CRIPA, Olmstead, and the transformation of the Oregon psychiatric security review board. / Bloom, Joseph.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, Vol. 40, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 383-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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