CRF receptor antagonist astressin-B reverses and prevents alopecia in CRF over-expressing mice

Lixin Wang, Mulugeta Million, Jean Rivier, Catherine Rivier, Noah Craft, Mary Stenzel-Poore, Yvette Taché

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways are involved in the stress response, and there is growing evidence supporting hair growth inhibition of murine hair follicle in vivo upon stress exposure. We investigated whether the blockade of CRF receptors influences the development of hair loss in CRF over-expressing (OE)-mice that display phenotypes of Cushing's syndrome and chronic stress, including alopecia. The non-selective CRF receptors antagonist, astressin-B (5 μg/mouse) injected peripherally once a day for 5 days in 4-9 months old CRF-OE alopecic mice induced pigmentation and hair re-growth that was largely retained for over 4 months. In young CRF-OE mice, astressin-B prevented the development of alopecia that occurred in saline-treated mice. Histological examination indicated that alopecic CRF-OE mice had hair follicle atrophy and that astressin-B revived the hair follicle from the telogen to anagen phase. However, astressin-B did not show any effect on the elevated plasma corticosterone levels and the increased weights of adrenal glands and visceral fat in CRF-OE mice. The selective CRF2 receptor antagonist, astressin2-B had moderate effect on pigmentation, but not on hair re-growth. The commercial drug for alopecia, minoxidil only showed partial effect on hair re-growth. These data support the existence of a key molecular switching mechanism triggered by blocking peripheral CRF receptors with an antagonist to reset hair growth in a mouse model of alopecia associated with chronic stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere16377
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors
corticotropin-releasing hormone
alopecia
Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone
Alopecia
antagonists
receptors
Hair
mice
hairs
Hair Follicle
hair follicles
regrowth
Growth
Pigmentation
Minoxidil
pigmentation
Corticosterone
Cushing syndrome
Intra-Abdominal Fat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

CRF receptor antagonist astressin-B reverses and prevents alopecia in CRF over-expressing mice. / Wang, Lixin; Million, Mulugeta; Rivier, Jean; Rivier, Catherine; Craft, Noah; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Taché, Yvette.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 2, e16377, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Lixin ; Million, Mulugeta ; Rivier, Jean ; Rivier, Catherine ; Craft, Noah ; Stenzel-Poore, Mary ; Taché, Yvette. / CRF receptor antagonist astressin-B reverses and prevents alopecia in CRF over-expressing mice. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 2.
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