Cost of providing injectable contraceptives through a community-based social marketing program in Tigray, Ethiopia

Ndola Prata, Janelle Downing, Suzanne Bell, Karen Weidert, Hagos Godefay, Amanuel Gessessew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To provide a cost analysis of an injectable contraceptive program combining community-based distribution and social marketing in Tigray, Ethiopia. Methods: We conducted a cost analysis, modeling the costs and programmatic outcomes of the program's initial implementation in 3 districts of Tigray, Ethiopia. Costs were estimated from a review of program expense records, invoices, and interviews with health workers. Programmatic outcomes include number of injections and couple-year of protection (CYP) provided. We performed a sensitivity analysis on the average number of injections provided per month by community health workers (CHWs), the cost of the commodity, and the number of CHWs trained. Results: The average programmatic CYP was US $17.91 for all districts with a substantial range from US $15.48-38.09 per CYP across districts. Direct service cost was estimated at US $2.96 per CYP. The cost per CYP was slightly sensitive to the commodity cost of the injectable contraceptives and the number of CHWs. The capacity of each CHW, measured by the number of injections sold, was a key input that drove the cost per CYP of this model. Conclusion: With a direct service cost of US $2.96 per CYP, this study demonstrates the potential cost of community-based social marketing programs of injectable contraceptives. The findings suggest that the cost of social marketing of contraceptives in rural communities is comparable to other delivery mechanisms with regards to CYP, but further research is needed to determine the full impact and cost-effectiveness for women and communities beyond what is measured in CYP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-491
Number of pages7
JournalContraception
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Marketing
Ethiopia
Contraceptive Agents
Costs and Cost Analysis
Injections
Direct Service Costs
Rural Population
Health Care Costs
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Community-based distribution
  • Cost-analysis
  • Couple-year of protection
  • Ethiopia
  • Injectable contraceptives
  • Social marketing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Cost of providing injectable contraceptives through a community-based social marketing program in Tigray, Ethiopia. / Prata, Ndola; Downing, Janelle; Bell, Suzanne; Weidert, Karen; Godefay, Hagos; Gessessew, Amanuel.

In: Contraception, Vol. 93, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 485-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prata, Ndola ; Downing, Janelle ; Bell, Suzanne ; Weidert, Karen ; Godefay, Hagos ; Gessessew, Amanuel. / Cost of providing injectable contraceptives through a community-based social marketing program in Tigray, Ethiopia. In: Contraception. 2016 ; Vol. 93, No. 6. pp. 485-491.
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