Cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking

Anjali J. Kaimal, Catherine C. Smith, Russell K. Laros, Aaron Caughey, Yvonne W. Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: To investigate the cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking. METHODS:: A decision-analytic model was designed comparing private umbilical cord blood banking with no umbilical cord blood banking. Baseline assumptions included a cost of $3,620 for umbilical cord blood banking and storage for 20 years, a 0.04% chance of requiring an autologous stem cell transplant, a 0.07% chance of a sibling requiring an allogenic stem cell transplant, and a 50% reduction in risk of graft-versus-host disease if a sibling uses banked umbilical cord blood. RESULTS:: Private cord blood banking is not cost-effective because it cost an additional $1,374,246 per life-year gained. In sensitivity analysis, if the cost of umbilical cord blood banking is less than $262 or the likelihood of a child needing a stem cell transplant is greater than 1 in 110, private umbilical cord blood banking becomes cost-effective. CONCLUSION:: Currently, private umbilical cord blood banking is cost-effective only for children with a very high likelihood of needing a stem cell transplant. Patients considering private blood banking should be informed of the remote likelihood that a unit will be used for a child or another family member.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)848-855
Number of pages8
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume114
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Blood Banks
Fetal Blood
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Stem Cells
Transplants
Siblings
Graft vs Host Disease
Risk Reduction Behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking. / Kaimal, Anjali J.; Smith, Catherine C.; Laros, Russell K.; Caughey, Aaron; Cheng, Yvonne W.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 114, No. 4, 10.2009, p. 848-855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaimal, Anjali J. ; Smith, Catherine C. ; Laros, Russell K. ; Caughey, Aaron ; Cheng, Yvonne W. / Cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2009 ; Vol. 114, No. 4. pp. 848-855.
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