Cost and Return on Investment of a Work-Family Intervention in the Extended Care Industry

Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network

William N. Dowd, Jeremy W. Bray, Carolina Barbosa, Krista Brockwood, David J. Kaiser, Michael J. Mills, David Hurtado, Bradley Wipfli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the cost and return on investment (ROI) of an intervention targeting work-family conflict (WFC) in the extended care industry. Methods: Costs to deliver the intervention during a group-randomized controlled trial were estimated, and data on organizational costs - presenteeism, health care costs, voluntary termination, and sick time - were collected from interviews and administrative data. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the intervention's impact on organizational costs. Combined, these results produced ROI estimates. A cluster-robust confidence interval (CI) was estimated around the ROI estimate. Results: The per-participant cost of the intervention was $767. The ROI was -1.54 (95% CI: -4.31 to 2.18). The intervention was associated with a $668 reduction in health care costs (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This paper builds upon and expands prior ROI estimation methods to a new setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)956-965
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume59
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Family Health
Industry
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Costs
Confidence Intervals
Linear Models
Randomized Controlled Trials
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cost and Return on Investment of a Work-Family Intervention in the Extended Care Industry : Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network. / Dowd, William N.; Bray, Jeremy W.; Barbosa, Carolina; Brockwood, Krista; Kaiser, David J.; Mills, Michael J.; Hurtado, David; Wipfli, Bradley.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 59, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 956-965.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dowd, William N. ; Bray, Jeremy W. ; Barbosa, Carolina ; Brockwood, Krista ; Kaiser, David J. ; Mills, Michael J. ; Hurtado, David ; Wipfli, Bradley. / Cost and Return on Investment of a Work-Family Intervention in the Extended Care Industry : Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 59, No. 10. pp. 956-965.
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