Cost and Return on Investment of a Work-Family Intervention in the Extended Care Industry: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network

William N. Dowd, Jeremy W. Bray, Carolina Barbosa, Krista Brockwood, David J. Kaiser, Michael J. Mills, David Hurtado, Bradley Wipfli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the cost and return on investment (ROI) of an intervention targeting work-family conflict (WFC) in the extended care industry. Methods: Costs to deliver the intervention during a group-randomized controlled trial were estimated, and data on organizational costs - presenteeism, health care costs, voluntary termination, and sick time - were collected from interviews and administrative data. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the intervention's impact on organizational costs. Combined, these results produced ROI estimates. A cluster-robust confidence interval (CI) was estimated around the ROI estimate. Results: The per-participant cost of the intervention was $767. The ROI was -1.54 (95% CI: -4.31 to 2.18). The intervention was associated with a $668 reduction in health care costs (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This paper builds upon and expands prior ROI estimation methods to a new setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)956-965
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume59
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Family Health
Industry
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Costs
Confidence Intervals
Linear Models
Randomized Controlled Trials
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cost and Return on Investment of a Work-Family Intervention in the Extended Care Industry : Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network. / Dowd, William N.; Bray, Jeremy W.; Barbosa, Carolina; Brockwood, Krista; Kaiser, David J.; Mills, Michael J.; Hurtado, David; Wipfli, Bradley.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 59, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 956-965.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dowd, William N. ; Bray, Jeremy W. ; Barbosa, Carolina ; Brockwood, Krista ; Kaiser, David J. ; Mills, Michael J. ; Hurtado, David ; Wipfli, Bradley. / Cost and Return on Investment of a Work-Family Intervention in the Extended Care Industry : Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 59, No. 10. pp. 956-965.
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