Cortisol and inflammatory processes in ovarian cancer patients following primary treatment

Relationships with depression, fatigue, and disability

Andrew Schrepf, Lauren Clevenger, Desire Christensen, Koenraad De Geest, David Bender, Amina Ahmed, Michael J. Goodheart, Laila Dahmoush, Frank Penedo, Joseph A. Lucci, Parvin Ganjei-Azar, Luis Mendez, Kristian Markon, David M. Lubaroff, Premal H. Thaker, George M. Slavich, Anil K. Sood, Susan K. Lutgendorf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elevations in the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and alterations in the anti-inflammatory hormone cortisol have been reported in a variety of cancers. IL-6 has prognostic significance in ovarian cancer and cortisol has been associated with fatigue, disability, and vegetative depression in ovarian cancer patients prior to surgery. Ovarian cancer patients undergoing primary treatment completed psychological self-report measures and collected salivary cortisol and plasma IL-6 prior to surgery, at 6. months, and at 1. year. Patients included in this study had completed chemotherapy and had no evidence of disease recurrence. At 6. months, patients showed significant reductions in nocturnal cortisol secretion, plasma IL-6, and a more normalized diurnal cortisol rhythm, changes that were maintained at 1. year. The reductions in IL-6 and nocturnal cortisol were associated with declines in self-reported fatigue, vegetative depression, and disability. These findings suggest that primary treatment for ovarian cancer reduces the inflammatory response. Moreover, patients who have not developed recurrent disease by 1. year appear to maintain more normalized levels of cortisol and IL-6. Improvement in fatigue and vegetative depression is associated with the normalization of IL-6 and cortisol, a pattern which may be relevant for improvements in overall quality of life for ovarian cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume30
Issue numberSUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ovarian Neoplasms
Fatigue
Hydrocortisone
Interleukin-6
Therapeutics
Circadian Rhythm
Self Report
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Quality of Life
Hormones
Cytokines
Psychology
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cortisol
  • Depression
  • Disability
  • Fatigue
  • IL-6
  • Inflammation
  • Ovarian cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Cite this

Cortisol and inflammatory processes in ovarian cancer patients following primary treatment : Relationships with depression, fatigue, and disability. / Schrepf, Andrew; Clevenger, Lauren; Christensen, Desire; De Geest, Koenraad; Bender, David; Ahmed, Amina; Goodheart, Michael J.; Dahmoush, Laila; Penedo, Frank; Lucci, Joseph A.; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Mendez, Luis; Markon, Kristian; Lubaroff, David M.; Thaker, Premal H.; Slavich, George M.; Sood, Anil K.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.

In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Vol. 30, No. SUPPL., 15.03.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schrepf, A, Clevenger, L, Christensen, D, De Geest, K, Bender, D, Ahmed, A, Goodheart, MJ, Dahmoush, L, Penedo, F, Lucci, JA, Ganjei-Azar, P, Mendez, L, Markon, K, Lubaroff, DM, Thaker, PH, Slavich, GM, Sood, AK & Lutgendorf, SK 2013, 'Cortisol and inflammatory processes in ovarian cancer patients following primary treatment: Relationships with depression, fatigue, and disability', Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, vol. 30, no. SUPPL.. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2012.07.022
Schrepf, Andrew ; Clevenger, Lauren ; Christensen, Desire ; De Geest, Koenraad ; Bender, David ; Ahmed, Amina ; Goodheart, Michael J. ; Dahmoush, Laila ; Penedo, Frank ; Lucci, Joseph A. ; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin ; Mendez, Luis ; Markon, Kristian ; Lubaroff, David M. ; Thaker, Premal H. ; Slavich, George M. ; Sood, Anil K. ; Lutgendorf, Susan K. / Cortisol and inflammatory processes in ovarian cancer patients following primary treatment : Relationships with depression, fatigue, and disability. In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. 2013 ; Vol. 30, No. SUPPL.
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