Corticosteroid receptors in brain: Relationship of receptors to effects in stress and aging

B. McEwen, H. Chao, R. Spencer, R. Brinton, L. Macisaac, Allan Harrelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current information concerning glucocorticoid effects in the brain indicate that the hippocampus is a unique hormone target area which is important both in cognition as well as in affective response. Nevertheless, glucocorticoid actions in cerebral cortex and corpus striatum, as well as many other brain regions, appear to participate in the response of the brain to repeated stress. Studies of glucocorticoid receptors in the brain and their interaction with specific genes, such as those producing neuropeptides like proenkephalin and proopiomelanocortin, should continue to shed light on underlying molecular mechanisms, especially those which may illuminate differential hormone effects on the same gene product in different brain regions or in the same brain region of animals of different sexes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-401
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume512
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Steroid Receptors
Brain
Aging of materials
Glucocorticoids
Genes
Hormones
Corpus Striatum
Pro-Opiomelanocortin
Glucocorticoid Receptors
Neuropeptides
Cerebral Cortex
Cognition
Hippocampus
Animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Corticosteroid receptors in brain : Relationship of receptors to effects in stress and aging. / McEwen, B.; Chao, H.; Spencer, R.; Brinton, R.; Macisaac, L.; Harrelson, Allan.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 512, 1987, p. 394-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McEwen, B. ; Chao, H. ; Spencer, R. ; Brinton, R. ; Macisaac, L. ; Harrelson, Allan. / Corticosteroid receptors in brain : Relationship of receptors to effects in stress and aging. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1987 ; Vol. 512. pp. 394-401.
@article{1a6ee328a61348338130a45998214b31,
title = "Corticosteroid receptors in brain: Relationship of receptors to effects in stress and aging",
abstract = "Current information concerning glucocorticoid effects in the brain indicate that the hippocampus is a unique hormone target area which is important both in cognition as well as in affective response. Nevertheless, glucocorticoid actions in cerebral cortex and corpus striatum, as well as many other brain regions, appear to participate in the response of the brain to repeated stress. Studies of glucocorticoid receptors in the brain and their interaction with specific genes, such as those producing neuropeptides like proenkephalin and proopiomelanocortin, should continue to shed light on underlying molecular mechanisms, especially those which may illuminate differential hormone effects on the same gene product in different brain regions or in the same brain region of animals of different sexes.",
author = "B. McEwen and H. Chao and R. Spencer and R. Brinton and L. Macisaac and Allan Harrelson",
year = "1987",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "512",
pages = "394--401",
journal = "Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences",
issn = "0077-8923",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Corticosteroid receptors in brain

T2 - Relationship of receptors to effects in stress and aging

AU - McEwen, B.

AU - Chao, H.

AU - Spencer, R.

AU - Brinton, R.

AU - Macisaac, L.

AU - Harrelson, Allan

PY - 1987

Y1 - 1987

N2 - Current information concerning glucocorticoid effects in the brain indicate that the hippocampus is a unique hormone target area which is important both in cognition as well as in affective response. Nevertheless, glucocorticoid actions in cerebral cortex and corpus striatum, as well as many other brain regions, appear to participate in the response of the brain to repeated stress. Studies of glucocorticoid receptors in the brain and their interaction with specific genes, such as those producing neuropeptides like proenkephalin and proopiomelanocortin, should continue to shed light on underlying molecular mechanisms, especially those which may illuminate differential hormone effects on the same gene product in different brain regions or in the same brain region of animals of different sexes.

AB - Current information concerning glucocorticoid effects in the brain indicate that the hippocampus is a unique hormone target area which is important both in cognition as well as in affective response. Nevertheless, glucocorticoid actions in cerebral cortex and corpus striatum, as well as many other brain regions, appear to participate in the response of the brain to repeated stress. Studies of glucocorticoid receptors in the brain and their interaction with specific genes, such as those producing neuropeptides like proenkephalin and proopiomelanocortin, should continue to shed light on underlying molecular mechanisms, especially those which may illuminate differential hormone effects on the same gene product in different brain regions or in the same brain region of animals of different sexes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023615113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023615113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 3327425

AN - SCOPUS:0023615113

VL - 512

SP - 394

EP - 401

JO - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

JF - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

SN - 0077-8923

ER -