Cortical activation during delay discounting in abstinent methamphetamine dependent individuals

William F. Hoffman, Daniel L. Schwartz, Marilyn Huckans, Bentson McFarland, Gal Meiri, Alexander Stevens, Suzanne Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

138 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Methamphetamine (MA)-dependent individuals prefer smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards in delay discounting (DD) tasks. Human and animal data implicate ventral (amygdala, ventral striatum, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex insula) and dorsal (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and posterior parietal cortex) systems in DD decisions. The ventral system is hypothesized to respond to the salience and immediacy of rewards while the dorsal system is implicated in the process of comparison and choice. Methods: We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to probe the neural correlates of DD in 19 recently abstinent MA-dependent patients and 17 age- and gender-matched controls. Results: Hard DD choices were associated with greatest activation in bilateral middle cingulate, posterior parietal cortex (PPC), and the right rostral insula. Control subjects showed more activation than MA patients bilaterally in the precuneus and in the right caudate nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Magnitude of discounting was correlated with activity in the amygdala, DLPFC, posterior cingulate cortex and PPC. Conclusions: Our findings were consistent with a model wherein dorsal cognitive systems modulate the neural response of ventral regions. Patients addicted to MA, who strongly prefer smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards, activate the dorsal cognitive control system in order to overcome their preference. Activation of the amygdala during choice of delayed rewards was associated with a greater degree of discounting, suggesting that heavily discounting MA-dependent individuals may be more responsive to the negative salience of delayed rewards than controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-193
Number of pages11
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume201
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Reward
Parietal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Gyrus Cinguli
Amygdala
Caudate Nucleus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Delay Discounting

Keywords

  • Brain imaging
  • Delay discounting
  • Methamphetamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Cortical activation during delay discounting in abstinent methamphetamine dependent individuals. / Hoffman, William F.; Schwartz, Daniel L.; Huckans, Marilyn; McFarland, Bentson; Meiri, Gal; Stevens, Alexander; Mitchell, Suzanne.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 201, No. 2, 12.2008, p. 183-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoffman, William F. ; Schwartz, Daniel L. ; Huckans, Marilyn ; McFarland, Bentson ; Meiri, Gal ; Stevens, Alexander ; Mitchell, Suzanne. / Cortical activation during delay discounting in abstinent methamphetamine dependent individuals. In: Psychopharmacology. 2008 ; Vol. 201, No. 2. pp. 183-193.
@article{305e7fe21f2844a689dc6fe2c7d83599,
title = "Cortical activation during delay discounting in abstinent methamphetamine dependent individuals",
abstract = "Background: Methamphetamine (MA)-dependent individuals prefer smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards in delay discounting (DD) tasks. Human and animal data implicate ventral (amygdala, ventral striatum, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex insula) and dorsal (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and posterior parietal cortex) systems in DD decisions. The ventral system is hypothesized to respond to the salience and immediacy of rewards while the dorsal system is implicated in the process of comparison and choice. Methods: We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to probe the neural correlates of DD in 19 recently abstinent MA-dependent patients and 17 age- and gender-matched controls. Results: Hard DD choices were associated with greatest activation in bilateral middle cingulate, posterior parietal cortex (PPC), and the right rostral insula. Control subjects showed more activation than MA patients bilaterally in the precuneus and in the right caudate nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Magnitude of discounting was correlated with activity in the amygdala, DLPFC, posterior cingulate cortex and PPC. Conclusions: Our findings were consistent with a model wherein dorsal cognitive systems modulate the neural response of ventral regions. Patients addicted to MA, who strongly prefer smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards, activate the dorsal cognitive control system in order to overcome their preference. Activation of the amygdala during choice of delayed rewards was associated with a greater degree of discounting, suggesting that heavily discounting MA-dependent individuals may be more responsive to the negative salience of delayed rewards than controls.",
keywords = "Brain imaging, Delay discounting, Methamphetamine",
author = "Hoffman, {William F.} and Schwartz, {Daniel L.} and Marilyn Huckans and Bentson McFarland and Gal Meiri and Alexander Stevens and Suzanne Mitchell",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s00213-008-1261-1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "201",
pages = "183--193",
journal = "Psychopharmacology",
issn = "0033-3158",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cortical activation during delay discounting in abstinent methamphetamine dependent individuals

AU - Hoffman, William F.

AU - Schwartz, Daniel L.

AU - Huckans, Marilyn

AU - McFarland, Bentson

AU - Meiri, Gal

AU - Stevens, Alexander

AU - Mitchell, Suzanne

PY - 2008/12

Y1 - 2008/12

N2 - Background: Methamphetamine (MA)-dependent individuals prefer smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards in delay discounting (DD) tasks. Human and animal data implicate ventral (amygdala, ventral striatum, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex insula) and dorsal (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and posterior parietal cortex) systems in DD decisions. The ventral system is hypothesized to respond to the salience and immediacy of rewards while the dorsal system is implicated in the process of comparison and choice. Methods: We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to probe the neural correlates of DD in 19 recently abstinent MA-dependent patients and 17 age- and gender-matched controls. Results: Hard DD choices were associated with greatest activation in bilateral middle cingulate, posterior parietal cortex (PPC), and the right rostral insula. Control subjects showed more activation than MA patients bilaterally in the precuneus and in the right caudate nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Magnitude of discounting was correlated with activity in the amygdala, DLPFC, posterior cingulate cortex and PPC. Conclusions: Our findings were consistent with a model wherein dorsal cognitive systems modulate the neural response of ventral regions. Patients addicted to MA, who strongly prefer smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards, activate the dorsal cognitive control system in order to overcome their preference. Activation of the amygdala during choice of delayed rewards was associated with a greater degree of discounting, suggesting that heavily discounting MA-dependent individuals may be more responsive to the negative salience of delayed rewards than controls.

AB - Background: Methamphetamine (MA)-dependent individuals prefer smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards in delay discounting (DD) tasks. Human and animal data implicate ventral (amygdala, ventral striatum, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex insula) and dorsal (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and posterior parietal cortex) systems in DD decisions. The ventral system is hypothesized to respond to the salience and immediacy of rewards while the dorsal system is implicated in the process of comparison and choice. Methods: We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to probe the neural correlates of DD in 19 recently abstinent MA-dependent patients and 17 age- and gender-matched controls. Results: Hard DD choices were associated with greatest activation in bilateral middle cingulate, posterior parietal cortex (PPC), and the right rostral insula. Control subjects showed more activation than MA patients bilaterally in the precuneus and in the right caudate nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Magnitude of discounting was correlated with activity in the amygdala, DLPFC, posterior cingulate cortex and PPC. Conclusions: Our findings were consistent with a model wherein dorsal cognitive systems modulate the neural response of ventral regions. Patients addicted to MA, who strongly prefer smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards, activate the dorsal cognitive control system in order to overcome their preference. Activation of the amygdala during choice of delayed rewards was associated with a greater degree of discounting, suggesting that heavily discounting MA-dependent individuals may be more responsive to the negative salience of delayed rewards than controls.

KW - Brain imaging

KW - Delay discounting

KW - Methamphetamine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=56349148680&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=56349148680&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00213-008-1261-1

DO - 10.1007/s00213-008-1261-1

M3 - Article

C2 - 18685833

AN - SCOPUS:56349148680

VL - 201

SP - 183

EP - 193

JO - Psychopharmacology

JF - Psychopharmacology

SN - 0033-3158

IS - 2

ER -