Correlates of physical activity for adults with disability

Sarah E. Boslaugh, Elena Andresen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study was designed to determine factors that influence the physical activity level of adults with disability as identified in a large representative sample of U.S. adults. Methods Data were taken from the District of Columbia and the 12 states that administered the Quality of Life and Caregiving Module of the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Adults with disability (n = 4038) were defined as those who required special equipment because of a health problem or who required the assistance of another person either for their personal care or routine needs. Adequate physical activity was defined as meeting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and American College of Sports Medicine recommendation of at least 30 minutes of moderate activity per day at least 5 days per week. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios were computed for demographic, health status, health care access, and health behavior variables. Results Only one fourth of the study population met the recommendation for moderate activity level. African American race, age of 50 years or older, annual income of $50,000 or higher, and being in good, fair, or poor health were all significantly related to activity level; sex, education level, health care access, and years of disability were not. Conclusion: Adults with disability are not meeting basic recommendations for physical activity. Some correlates of physical activity found in general populations are also related to activity level for people with disability (age, general health, race), whereas others (sex, education level) are not. These factors should be considered when planning physical activity interventions for people with disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume3
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Exercise
Sex Education
Disabled Persons
Health Status
Health
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Delivery of Health Care
Health Behavior
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
African Americans
Population
Odds Ratio
Quality of Life
Demography
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Correlates of physical activity for adults with disability. / Boslaugh, Sarah E.; Andresen, Elena.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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