Correlates of peak expiratory flow lability in elderly persons

Paul L. Enright, Robyn L. McClelland, A (Sonia) Buist, Norbert Yanez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the correlates of the lability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) in the elderly. Methods: A community sample of 4,581 persons ≥ 65 years old from the Cardiovascular Health Study completed an asthma questionnaire and underwent spirometry. During a follow-up examination of the cohort, 1,836 persons agreed to measure PEF at home twice daily for 2 weeks, and 90% successfully obtained at least 4 days of valid measurements. PEF lability was calculated as the highest daily (PEF maximum - PEF minimum)/mean PEF. Results: Mean PEF measured at home was accurate when compared to PEF determined by spirometry in the clinic. Mean PEF lability was 18% in those with current asthma (n = 165) vs 12% in healthy nonsmokers (upper limit of normal, 29%). Approximately 26% of those with asthma and 14% of the other participants had abnormally high PEF lability (> 29%). After excluding participants with asthma, other independent predictors of high PEF lability included black race, current and former smoking, airway obstruction on spirometry, daytime sleepiness, recent wheezing, chronic cough, emphysema, and wheezing from lying in a supine position. Despite having a lower mean PEF, those reporting congestive heart failure (n = 82) did not have significantly higher PEF lability. Conclusions: Measurement of PEF lability at home is highly successful in elderly persons. PEF lability ≥ 30% is abnormal in the elderly and is associated with asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1861-1868
Number of pages8
JournalChest
Volume120
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Asthma
Spirometry
Respiratory Sounds
Supine Position
Emphysema
Airway Obstruction
Cough
Heart Failure
Smoking
Health

Keywords

  • Airway lability
  • Asthma
  • Elderly
  • Peak expiratory flow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Correlates of peak expiratory flow lability in elderly persons. / Enright, Paul L.; McClelland, Robyn L.; Buist, A (Sonia); Yanez, Norbert.

In: Chest, Vol. 120, No. 6, 2001, p. 1861-1868.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Enright, Paul L. ; McClelland, Robyn L. ; Buist, A (Sonia) ; Yanez, Norbert. / Correlates of peak expiratory flow lability in elderly persons. In: Chest. 2001 ; Vol. 120, No. 6. pp. 1861-1868.
@article{7d8c78894a16452dba947ea34e119709,
title = "Correlates of peak expiratory flow lability in elderly persons",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the correlates of the lability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) in the elderly. Methods: A community sample of 4,581 persons ≥ 65 years old from the Cardiovascular Health Study completed an asthma questionnaire and underwent spirometry. During a follow-up examination of the cohort, 1,836 persons agreed to measure PEF at home twice daily for 2 weeks, and 90{\%} successfully obtained at least 4 days of valid measurements. PEF lability was calculated as the highest daily (PEF maximum - PEF minimum)/mean PEF. Results: Mean PEF measured at home was accurate when compared to PEF determined by spirometry in the clinic. Mean PEF lability was 18{\%} in those with current asthma (n = 165) vs 12{\%} in healthy nonsmokers (upper limit of normal, 29{\%}). Approximately 26{\%} of those with asthma and 14{\%} of the other participants had abnormally high PEF lability (> 29{\%}). After excluding participants with asthma, other independent predictors of high PEF lability included black race, current and former smoking, airway obstruction on spirometry, daytime sleepiness, recent wheezing, chronic cough, emphysema, and wheezing from lying in a supine position. Despite having a lower mean PEF, those reporting congestive heart failure (n = 82) did not have significantly higher PEF lability. Conclusions: Measurement of PEF lability at home is highly successful in elderly persons. PEF lability ≥ 30{\%} is abnormal in the elderly and is associated with asthma.",
keywords = "Airway lability, Asthma, Elderly, Peak expiratory flow",
author = "Enright, {Paul L.} and McClelland, {Robyn L.} and Buist, {A (Sonia)} and Norbert Yanez",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1378/chest.120.6.1861",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "120",
pages = "1861--1868",
journal = "Chest",
issn = "0012-3692",
publisher = "American College of Chest Physicians",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlates of peak expiratory flow lability in elderly persons

AU - Enright, Paul L.

AU - McClelland, Robyn L.

AU - Buist, A (Sonia)

AU - Yanez, Norbert

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Objective: To determine the correlates of the lability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) in the elderly. Methods: A community sample of 4,581 persons ≥ 65 years old from the Cardiovascular Health Study completed an asthma questionnaire and underwent spirometry. During a follow-up examination of the cohort, 1,836 persons agreed to measure PEF at home twice daily for 2 weeks, and 90% successfully obtained at least 4 days of valid measurements. PEF lability was calculated as the highest daily (PEF maximum - PEF minimum)/mean PEF. Results: Mean PEF measured at home was accurate when compared to PEF determined by spirometry in the clinic. Mean PEF lability was 18% in those with current asthma (n = 165) vs 12% in healthy nonsmokers (upper limit of normal, 29%). Approximately 26% of those with asthma and 14% of the other participants had abnormally high PEF lability (> 29%). After excluding participants with asthma, other independent predictors of high PEF lability included black race, current and former smoking, airway obstruction on spirometry, daytime sleepiness, recent wheezing, chronic cough, emphysema, and wheezing from lying in a supine position. Despite having a lower mean PEF, those reporting congestive heart failure (n = 82) did not have significantly higher PEF lability. Conclusions: Measurement of PEF lability at home is highly successful in elderly persons. PEF lability ≥ 30% is abnormal in the elderly and is associated with asthma.

AB - Objective: To determine the correlates of the lability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) in the elderly. Methods: A community sample of 4,581 persons ≥ 65 years old from the Cardiovascular Health Study completed an asthma questionnaire and underwent spirometry. During a follow-up examination of the cohort, 1,836 persons agreed to measure PEF at home twice daily for 2 weeks, and 90% successfully obtained at least 4 days of valid measurements. PEF lability was calculated as the highest daily (PEF maximum - PEF minimum)/mean PEF. Results: Mean PEF measured at home was accurate when compared to PEF determined by spirometry in the clinic. Mean PEF lability was 18% in those with current asthma (n = 165) vs 12% in healthy nonsmokers (upper limit of normal, 29%). Approximately 26% of those with asthma and 14% of the other participants had abnormally high PEF lability (> 29%). After excluding participants with asthma, other independent predictors of high PEF lability included black race, current and former smoking, airway obstruction on spirometry, daytime sleepiness, recent wheezing, chronic cough, emphysema, and wheezing from lying in a supine position. Despite having a lower mean PEF, those reporting congestive heart failure (n = 82) did not have significantly higher PEF lability. Conclusions: Measurement of PEF lability at home is highly successful in elderly persons. PEF lability ≥ 30% is abnormal in the elderly and is associated with asthma.

KW - Airway lability

KW - Asthma

KW - Elderly

KW - Peak expiratory flow

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035687913&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035687913&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1378/chest.120.6.1861

DO - 10.1378/chest.120.6.1861

M3 - Article

VL - 120

SP - 1861

EP - 1868

JO - Chest

JF - Chest

SN - 0012-3692

IS - 6

ER -