Correlated and Coupled Cognitive Change in Older Adults with and without Preclinical Dementia

Martin J. Sliwinski, Scott Hofer, Charles Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Common factor aging theories state that correlations among cognitive age effects signify a single underlying causal process. The logic underlying this proposition was evaluated by examining correlated cognitive change in a sample of 391 initially nondemented older adults who were tested annually for up to 16 years. Between-person correlations among rates of change (range = .56-.61) were partly attributable to model misspecification and the aggregation of heterogeneous groups of individuals. Correlated within-person cognitive change was much stronger in the cases (.45-.51) than in the noncases (.07-.18). These results demonstrate that correlated change may either signify causal commonality or the cumulative effects of multiple age-related conditions that can affect multiple cognitive systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-683
Number of pages12
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Dementia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Correlated and Coupled Cognitive Change in Older Adults with and without Preclinical Dementia. / Sliwinski, Martin J.; Hofer, Scott; Hall, Charles.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 18, No. 4, 12.2003, p. 672-683.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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