Controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury acutely disrupts wakefulness and extracellular orexin dynamics as determined by intracerebral microdialysis in mice

Jon T. Willie, Miranda Lim, Rachel E. Bennett, Allan A. Azarion, Katherine E. Schwetye, David L. Brody

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among other deficits, traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes impaired arousal and cognitive dysfunction. Hypothalamic orexin neuropeptides (also called hypocretins) regulate levels of arousal, and cerebrospinal fluid orexin levels are reportedly low in TBI patients. We hypothesized that TBI acutely impairs the dynamics of orexin release into brain interstitial fluid, and that these extracellular orexin levels correlate with wakefulness and motor activity. To test this in mice, we combined an electromagnetic controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of experimental TBI with dual intracerebral microdialysis using one catheter in the hypothalamus and one catheter in the hippocampus, plus electroencephalography/electromyography (EEG/EMG), and motor activity monitoring. Baseline data were continuously collected in tethered but relatively freely moving mice for 2 days. Then, ipsilateral CCI or sham surgery was performed, and data collection was continued for 3 additional days. At baseline, extracellular orexin levels in the hypothalamus showed a circadian rhythm, with peak levels during the dark (wake) phase, and a nadir during the light (rest) phase. Following CCI but not sham surgery, orexin levels were depressed in both the hypothalamus and hippocampus, and diurnal fluctuation amplitudes were blunted in the hypothalamus. At baseline, correlations of orexin with wakefulness and motor activity were positive and highly significant. Following CCI but not sham surgery, the mice exhibited reduced wakefulness and motor activity, and correlations between orexin and these measures were diminished. These abnormal orexin dynamics were associated with hypothalamic astrogliosis, but not acute loss of orexin neurons, as assessed by immunohistochemistry 3 days after injury. Future studies involving experimental manipulations of the orexin system will be required to determine its contribution to neurological outcomes following injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1908-1921
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Wakefulness
Microdialysis
Hypothalamus
Motor Activity
Arousal
Hippocampus
Catheters
Electromagnetic Phenomena
Extracellular Fluid
Wounds and Injuries
Electromyography
Circadian Rhythm
Neuropeptides
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Electroencephalography
Theoretical Models
Immunohistochemistry
Neurons
Light
Traumatic Brain Injury

Keywords

  • circadian rhythm
  • electroencephalography
  • electromyography
  • hypocretin
  • hypothalamus
  • microdialysis
  • orexin
  • sleep
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury acutely disrupts wakefulness and extracellular orexin dynamics as determined by intracerebral microdialysis in mice. / Willie, Jon T.; Lim, Miranda; Bennett, Rachel E.; Azarion, Allan A.; Schwetye, Katherine E.; Brody, David L.

In: Journal of Neurotrauma, Vol. 29, No. 10, 01.07.2012, p. 1908-1921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Willie, Jon T. ; Lim, Miranda ; Bennett, Rachel E. ; Azarion, Allan A. ; Schwetye, Katherine E. ; Brody, David L. / Controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury acutely disrupts wakefulness and extracellular orexin dynamics as determined by intracerebral microdialysis in mice. In: Journal of Neurotrauma. 2012 ; Vol. 29, No. 10. pp. 1908-1921.
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