Contributions of H G Khorana to understanding transmembrane signal transduction

David Farrens, Thomas P. Sakmar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Heptahelical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are located in the cell's plasma membrane and are responsible for transmitting chemical signals across the lipid bilayer. GPCRs comprise a large family of related receptors that have evolved to bind a wide range of extracellular ligands, from biogenic amines and neuromodulatory peptides to peptide hormones and proteins, and to lipids and fatty acids, to name but a few. Recent advances in the study of structural biology of GPCRs, including reports of high-resolution crystal structures of nearly ten different receptors have transformed the field. Beginning in the mid-1980's and continuing until his retirement, H Gobind Khorana and his co-workers at MIT worked on the prototypical GPCR rhodopsin and provided an early framework of experimental technologies and discoverieswhich propelled the field forward and continue to have a huge impact on literally hundreds of laboratories worldwide.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1165-1173
Number of pages9
JournalResonance
Volume17
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • GPCR
  • Rhodopsin
  • Signal transduction
  • structure-function
  • vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General
  • Education

Cite this

Contributions of H G Khorana to understanding transmembrane signal transduction. / Farrens, David; Sakmar, Thomas P.

In: Resonance, Vol. 17, No. 12, 2012, p. 1165-1173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farrens, David ; Sakmar, Thomas P. / Contributions of H G Khorana to understanding transmembrane signal transduction. In: Resonance. 2012 ; Vol. 17, No. 12. pp. 1165-1173.
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