Contribution of the innate immune system to autoimmune diabetes

A role for the CR1/CR2 complement receptors

Hooman Noorchashm, Daniel J. Moore, Yen K. Lieu, Negin Noorchashm, Alexander Schlachterman, Howard Song, John D. Lambris, Clyde F. Barker, Ali Naji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

B lymphocytes are required for diabetogenesis in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The complement component of the innate immune system regulates B cell activation and tolerance through complement receptors CR1/CR2. Thus, it is important to assess the contribution of complement receptors to autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Examination of the lymphoid compartments of NOD mice revealed striking expansion of a splenic B cell subset with high cell surface expression of CR1/CR2. This subset of B cells exhibited an enhanced C3 binding ability. Importantly, long-term in vivo blockade of C3 binding to CR1/CR2 prevented the emergence of the CR1/CR2(hi) B cells and afforded resistance to autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. These findings implicate complement as an important regulatory element in controlling the T cell- mediated attack on islet β cells of NOD mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-79
Number of pages5
JournalCellular Immunology
Volume195
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 10 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Complement 3d Receptors
Complement Receptors
Inbred NOD Mouse
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Immune System
B-Lymphocyte Subsets
B-Lymphocytes
Islets of Langerhans
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Noorchashm, H., Moore, D. J., Lieu, Y. K., Noorchashm, N., Schlachterman, A., Song, H., ... Naji, A. (1999). Contribution of the innate immune system to autoimmune diabetes: A role for the CR1/CR2 complement receptors. Cellular Immunology, 195(1), 75-79. https://doi.org/10.1006/cimm.1999.1522

Contribution of the innate immune system to autoimmune diabetes : A role for the CR1/CR2 complement receptors. / Noorchashm, Hooman; Moore, Daniel J.; Lieu, Yen K.; Noorchashm, Negin; Schlachterman, Alexander; Song, Howard; Lambris, John D.; Barker, Clyde F.; Naji, Ali.

In: Cellular Immunology, Vol. 195, No. 1, 10.07.1999, p. 75-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Noorchashm, H, Moore, DJ, Lieu, YK, Noorchashm, N, Schlachterman, A, Song, H, Lambris, JD, Barker, CF & Naji, A 1999, 'Contribution of the innate immune system to autoimmune diabetes: A role for the CR1/CR2 complement receptors', Cellular Immunology, vol. 195, no. 1, pp. 75-79. https://doi.org/10.1006/cimm.1999.1522
Noorchashm, Hooman ; Moore, Daniel J. ; Lieu, Yen K. ; Noorchashm, Negin ; Schlachterman, Alexander ; Song, Howard ; Lambris, John D. ; Barker, Clyde F. ; Naji, Ali. / Contribution of the innate immune system to autoimmune diabetes : A role for the CR1/CR2 complement receptors. In: Cellular Immunology. 1999 ; Vol. 195, No. 1. pp. 75-79.
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