Contact and role modeling predict bias against lesbian and gay individuals among early-career physicians: A longitudinal study

Natalie M. Wittlin, John F. Dovidio, Sara E. Burke, Julia M. Przedworski, Jeph Herrin, Liselotte Dyrbye, Ivuoma N. Onyeador, Sean M. Phelan, Michelle van Ryn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rationale: Physician bias against sexual minorities can hinder the delivery of high-quality health care and thus contribute to the disproportionate prevalence of negative health outcomes within this population. Medical students' interpersonal experiences within the context of medical school may contribute to this bias. Objective: The goal of the current research was to examine the relationship between these interpersonal experiences, reported by heterosexual, cisgender medical students, and explicit and implicit bias against lesbians and gay individuals, reported two years later during second year of medical residency. Method: Data were collected by surveying students (n = 2940) from a stratified sample of U.S. medical schools in fall 2010 (first semester of medical school), spring 2014 (final semester of medical school), and spring 2016 (second year of medical residency). Results: Amount and favorability of contact with LGBT individuals, reported during the final semester of medical school, predicted lower levels of explicit bias against lesbian and gay individuals during second year of medical residency. Additionally, exposure to negative role modeling, also reported during the final semester of medical school, predicted higher levels of explicit bias against lesbian and gay individuals during second year of medical residency. Amount of contact with LGBT individuals – and in particular, with LGBT medical students – predicted lower levels of implicit bias against lesbian and gay individuals during second year of medical residency. Neither favorability of contact with LGBT individuals nor exposure to negative role modeling predicted implicit bias against lesbian and gay individuals during second year of medical residency. Conclusion: These results suggest that interpersonal experiences during medical school can systematically shape heterosexual, cisgender physicians' subsequent explicit and implicit bias against lesbian and gay individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number112422
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume238
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
physician
career
contact
Physicians
Medical Schools
trend
Internship and Residency
semester
school
medical student
Medical Students
Heterosexuality
Sexual Minorities
Lesbian
Longitudinal Study
Modeling
experience
Medical School

Keywords

  • Bias
  • Longitudinal studies
  • Medical education
  • Sexual minorities
  • Sexual orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Contact and role modeling predict bias against lesbian and gay individuals among early-career physicians : A longitudinal study. / Wittlin, Natalie M.; Dovidio, John F.; Burke, Sara E.; Przedworski, Julia M.; Herrin, Jeph; Dyrbye, Liselotte; Onyeador, Ivuoma N.; Phelan, Sean M.; van Ryn, Michelle.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 238, 112422, 01.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wittlin, Natalie M. ; Dovidio, John F. ; Burke, Sara E. ; Przedworski, Julia M. ; Herrin, Jeph ; Dyrbye, Liselotte ; Onyeador, Ivuoma N. ; Phelan, Sean M. ; van Ryn, Michelle. / Contact and role modeling predict bias against lesbian and gay individuals among early-career physicians : A longitudinal study. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 238.
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