Consulting with children in the development of self-efficacy and recall tools related to nutrition and physical activity

Jane H. Lassetter, Gaye Ray, Martha Driessnack, Mary Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This article chronicles our efforts to develop an instrument with and for children-complete with insights, multiple iterations, and missteps along the way. The instruments we developed assess children's self-efficacy and recall related to healthy eating and physical activity. Design and Methods: Five focus groups were held with 39 children to discuss the evolving instrument. Results: A nine-item self-efficacy instrument and a 10-item recall instrument were developed with Flesch-Kincaid grade levels of 1.8 and 4.0, respectively, which fifth graders can complete in less than 5min. Practice Implications: When assessing children in clinical practice or research, we should use instruments that have been developed with children's feedback and are child-centered. Without that assurance, assessment results can be questionable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-28
Number of pages8
JournalJournal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Self Efficacy
Child Development
Exercise
Focus Groups
Research

Keywords

  • Child-centered
  • Instrument
  • Instrument development
  • Nutrition
  • Physical activity
  • Questionnaire
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Consulting with children in the development of self-efficacy and recall tools related to nutrition and physical activity. / Lassetter, Jane H.; Ray, Gaye; Driessnack, Martha; Williams, Mary.

In: Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 21-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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