Constipation is not associated with an increased rate of findings on colonoscopy: Results from a national endoscopy consortium

M. Gupta, J. Holub, Kandice Knigge, G. Eisen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and study aims: There are no definite guidelines regarding colonoscopic evaluation for the indication of constipation, a common gastrointestinal complaint. The aim of our study was to determine the risk of finding significant lesions in patients undergoing colonoscopy for the indication of constipation alone compared with constipation with another indication or average-risk screening. Patients and methods: A retrospective review of the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative database was carried out for colonoscopies undertaken between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2003. A total of 41775 index colonoscopies performed for the indications of average-risk screening, constipation only or constipation with another indication were identified. Logistic regression analyses were performed for constipation alone versus constipation with another indication, and for constipation alone versus average-risk screening. Results: Constipation alone did not show any increased risk of significant findings on colonoscopy. Constipation and the presence of another indication, however, had a statistically significant increased risk of a significant finding on colonoscopy. The indication of constipation alone had a lower risk of significant findings on colonoscopy compared with average-risk screening. Variations in the definition of constipation used was a limitation of the study. Conclusions: Colonoscopy for constipation alone has a lower yield for significant findings compared with average-risk screening and constipation with another indication; hence, colonoscopy should not be done for constipation alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-212
Number of pages5
JournalEndoscopy
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Constipation
Colonoscopy
Endoscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Constipation is not associated with an increased rate of findings on colonoscopy : Results from a national endoscopy consortium. / Gupta, M.; Holub, J.; Knigge, Kandice; Eisen, G.

In: Endoscopy, Vol. 42, No. 3, 2010, p. 208-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gupta, M. ; Holub, J. ; Knigge, Kandice ; Eisen, G. / Constipation is not associated with an increased rate of findings on colonoscopy : Results from a national endoscopy consortium. In: Endoscopy. 2010 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 208-212.
@article{7bef17e3104f4925b41bf039c370dd20,
title = "Constipation is not associated with an increased rate of findings on colonoscopy: Results from a national endoscopy consortium",
abstract = "Background and study aims: There are no definite guidelines regarding colonoscopic evaluation for the indication of constipation, a common gastrointestinal complaint. The aim of our study was to determine the risk of finding significant lesions in patients undergoing colonoscopy for the indication of constipation alone compared with constipation with another indication or average-risk screening. Patients and methods: A retrospective review of the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative database was carried out for colonoscopies undertaken between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2003. A total of 41775 index colonoscopies performed for the indications of average-risk screening, constipation only or constipation with another indication were identified. Logistic regression analyses were performed for constipation alone versus constipation with another indication, and for constipation alone versus average-risk screening. Results: Constipation alone did not show any increased risk of significant findings on colonoscopy. Constipation and the presence of another indication, however, had a statistically significant increased risk of a significant finding on colonoscopy. The indication of constipation alone had a lower risk of significant findings on colonoscopy compared with average-risk screening. Variations in the definition of constipation used was a limitation of the study. Conclusions: Colonoscopy for constipation alone has a lower yield for significant findings compared with average-risk screening and constipation with another indication; hence, colonoscopy should not be done for constipation alone.",
author = "M. Gupta and J. Holub and Kandice Knigge and G. Eisen",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1055/s-0029-1243843",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "208--212",
journal = "Endoscopy",
issn = "0013-726X",
publisher = "Georg Thieme Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Constipation is not associated with an increased rate of findings on colonoscopy

T2 - Results from a national endoscopy consortium

AU - Gupta, M.

AU - Holub, J.

AU - Knigge, Kandice

AU - Eisen, G.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Background and study aims: There are no definite guidelines regarding colonoscopic evaluation for the indication of constipation, a common gastrointestinal complaint. The aim of our study was to determine the risk of finding significant lesions in patients undergoing colonoscopy for the indication of constipation alone compared with constipation with another indication or average-risk screening. Patients and methods: A retrospective review of the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative database was carried out for colonoscopies undertaken between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2003. A total of 41775 index colonoscopies performed for the indications of average-risk screening, constipation only or constipation with another indication were identified. Logistic regression analyses were performed for constipation alone versus constipation with another indication, and for constipation alone versus average-risk screening. Results: Constipation alone did not show any increased risk of significant findings on colonoscopy. Constipation and the presence of another indication, however, had a statistically significant increased risk of a significant finding on colonoscopy. The indication of constipation alone had a lower risk of significant findings on colonoscopy compared with average-risk screening. Variations in the definition of constipation used was a limitation of the study. Conclusions: Colonoscopy for constipation alone has a lower yield for significant findings compared with average-risk screening and constipation with another indication; hence, colonoscopy should not be done for constipation alone.

AB - Background and study aims: There are no definite guidelines regarding colonoscopic evaluation for the indication of constipation, a common gastrointestinal complaint. The aim of our study was to determine the risk of finding significant lesions in patients undergoing colonoscopy for the indication of constipation alone compared with constipation with another indication or average-risk screening. Patients and methods: A retrospective review of the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative database was carried out for colonoscopies undertaken between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2003. A total of 41775 index colonoscopies performed for the indications of average-risk screening, constipation only or constipation with another indication were identified. Logistic regression analyses were performed for constipation alone versus constipation with another indication, and for constipation alone versus average-risk screening. Results: Constipation alone did not show any increased risk of significant findings on colonoscopy. Constipation and the presence of another indication, however, had a statistically significant increased risk of a significant finding on colonoscopy. The indication of constipation alone had a lower risk of significant findings on colonoscopy compared with average-risk screening. Variations in the definition of constipation used was a limitation of the study. Conclusions: Colonoscopy for constipation alone has a lower yield for significant findings compared with average-risk screening and constipation with another indication; hence, colonoscopy should not be done for constipation alone.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77749328936&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77749328936&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1055/s-0029-1243843

DO - 10.1055/s-0029-1243843

M3 - Article

C2 - 20101567

AN - SCOPUS:77749328936

VL - 42

SP - 208

EP - 212

JO - Endoscopy

JF - Endoscopy

SN - 0013-726X

IS - 3

ER -