Connecting in distance mentoring

Communication practices that work

Kathie Lasater, Patricia K. Young, Claudia G. Mitchell, Theresa M. Delahoyde, Jan M. Nick, Linda Siktberg

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: As nursing and healthcare become more global, supported by technology, the opportunities for distance mentoring increase. Mentorship is critical to nurse educator recruitment and retention. Study Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify communication practices of nurse educators involved in mentoring at a distance. Design/Settings: A qualitative design, utilizing in-person or telephone interviews was used. Participants were twenty-three protégés or mentors who were part of a yearlong distance mentoring program. Analysis Method: An iterative process of hermeneutic analysis identified three themes; this paper focuses on the theme of connectedness. Results: Participant narratives illuminate practices of connecting at a distance: meeting face-to-face, sharing personal information, experiencing reciprocity, journaling, being vulnerable, establishing one's presence, and appreciating different perspectives. Conclusion: Distance does not appear to limit the connecting potential leading to a meaningful mentoring relationship; rather, it offers possibilities that local mentoring relationships may not. Nurse educators in under-resourced countries, those in small programs without a cadre of senior faculty, and students in distance programs are among those who stand to benefit from distance mentoring relationships.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)501-506
    Number of pages6
    JournalNurse Education Today
    Volume34
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 2014

    Fingerprint

    mentoring
    Communication
    communication
    Mentors
    nurse
    Nurses
    educator
    Information Dissemination
    cadre
    telephone interview
    hermeneutics
    reciprocity
    Mentoring
    Nursing
    nursing
    Interviews
    Students
    Technology
    Delivery of Health Care
    narrative

    Keywords

    • Distance learning
    • Distance mentoring
    • Faculty, nursing
    • Mentoring
    • Nursing education
    • Qualitative

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Nursing(all)
    • Education

    Cite this

    Lasater, K., Young, P. K., Mitchell, C. G., Delahoyde, T. M., Nick, J. M., & Siktberg, L. (2014). Connecting in distance mentoring: Communication practices that work. Nurse Education Today, 34(4), 501-506. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2013.07.009

    Connecting in distance mentoring : Communication practices that work. / Lasater, Kathie; Young, Patricia K.; Mitchell, Claudia G.; Delahoyde, Theresa M.; Nick, Jan M.; Siktberg, Linda.

    In: Nurse Education Today, Vol. 34, No. 4, 04.2014, p. 501-506.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lasater, K, Young, PK, Mitchell, CG, Delahoyde, TM, Nick, JM & Siktberg, L 2014, 'Connecting in distance mentoring: Communication practices that work', Nurse Education Today, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 501-506. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2013.07.009
    Lasater, Kathie ; Young, Patricia K. ; Mitchell, Claudia G. ; Delahoyde, Theresa M. ; Nick, Jan M. ; Siktberg, Linda. / Connecting in distance mentoring : Communication practices that work. In: Nurse Education Today. 2014 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 501-506.
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