Congenital cardiac, aortic arch, and vascular bed anomalies in PHACE syndrome (from the International PHACE Syndrome Registry)

Michelle L. Bayer, Peter C. Frommelt, Francine Blei, Johannes M P J Breur, Maria R. Cordisco, Ilona J. Frieden, Deborah S. Goddard, Kristen E. Holland, Alfons Krol, Mohit Maheshwari, Denise W. Metry, Kimberly D. Morel, Paula E. North, Elena Pope, Joseph T. Shieh, James F. Southern, Orli Wargon, Dawn H. Siegel, Beth A. Drolet

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Abstract

PHACE syndrome represents the association of large infantile hemangiomas of the head and neck with brain, cerebrovascular, cardiac, ocular, and ventral or midline defects. Cardiac and cerebrovascular anomalies are the most common extracutaneous features of PHACE, and they also constitute the greatest source of potential morbidity. Congenital heart disease in PHACE is incompletely described, and this study was conducted to better characterize its features. This study of the International PHACE Syndrome Registry represents the largest central review of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic data for cardiovascular anomalies in patients with PHACE to date. Sixty-two (41%) of 150 subjects had intracardiac, aortic arch, or brachiocephalic vessel anomalies. Aberrant origin of a subclavian artery was the most common cardiovascular anomaly (present in 31 (21%) of 150 subjects). Coarctation was the second most common anomaly, identified in 28 (19%) of 150 subjects, and can be missed clinically in patients with PHACE because of the frequent association of arch obstruction with aberrant subclavian origin. Twenty-three (37%) of 62 subjects with cardiovascular anomalies required procedural intervention. A greater percentage of hemangiomas were located on the left side of the head and neck in patients with coarctation (46% vs 39%); however, hemangioma distribution did not predict the presence of cardiovascular anomalies overall. In conclusion, PHACE is associated with a high risk of congenital heart disease. Cardiac and aortic arch imaging with detailed assessment of arch patency and brachiocephalic origins is essential for any patient suspected of having PHACE. Longitudinal investigation is needed to determine the long-term outcomes of cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1948-1952
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume112
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2013

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Thoracic Aorta
Blood Vessels
Registries
Hemangioma
Heart Diseases
Neck
Head
Subclavian Artery
Morbidity
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bayer, M. L., Frommelt, P. C., Blei, F., Breur, J. M. P. J., Cordisco, M. R., Frieden, I. J., ... Drolet, B. A. (2013). Congenital cardiac, aortic arch, and vascular bed anomalies in PHACE syndrome (from the International PHACE Syndrome Registry). American Journal of Cardiology, 112(12), 1948-1952. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.08.025

Congenital cardiac, aortic arch, and vascular bed anomalies in PHACE syndrome (from the International PHACE Syndrome Registry). / Bayer, Michelle L.; Frommelt, Peter C.; Blei, Francine; Breur, Johannes M P J; Cordisco, Maria R.; Frieden, Ilona J.; Goddard, Deborah S.; Holland, Kristen E.; Krol, Alfons; Maheshwari, Mohit; Metry, Denise W.; Morel, Kimberly D.; North, Paula E.; Pope, Elena; Shieh, Joseph T.; Southern, James F.; Wargon, Orli; Siegel, Dawn H.; Drolet, Beth A.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 112, No. 12, 15.12.2013, p. 1948-1952.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bayer, ML, Frommelt, PC, Blei, F, Breur, JMPJ, Cordisco, MR, Frieden, IJ, Goddard, DS, Holland, KE, Krol, A, Maheshwari, M, Metry, DW, Morel, KD, North, PE, Pope, E, Shieh, JT, Southern, JF, Wargon, O, Siegel, DH & Drolet, BA 2013, 'Congenital cardiac, aortic arch, and vascular bed anomalies in PHACE syndrome (from the International PHACE Syndrome Registry)', American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 112, no. 12, pp. 1948-1952. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.08.025
Bayer, Michelle L. ; Frommelt, Peter C. ; Blei, Francine ; Breur, Johannes M P J ; Cordisco, Maria R. ; Frieden, Ilona J. ; Goddard, Deborah S. ; Holland, Kristen E. ; Krol, Alfons ; Maheshwari, Mohit ; Metry, Denise W. ; Morel, Kimberly D. ; North, Paula E. ; Pope, Elena ; Shieh, Joseph T. ; Southern, James F. ; Wargon, Orli ; Siegel, Dawn H. ; Drolet, Beth A. / Congenital cardiac, aortic arch, and vascular bed anomalies in PHACE syndrome (from the International PHACE Syndrome Registry). In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2013 ; Vol. 112, No. 12. pp. 1948-1952.
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abstract = "PHACE syndrome represents the association of large infantile hemangiomas of the head and neck with brain, cerebrovascular, cardiac, ocular, and ventral or midline defects. Cardiac and cerebrovascular anomalies are the most common extracutaneous features of PHACE, and they also constitute the greatest source of potential morbidity. Congenital heart disease in PHACE is incompletely described, and this study was conducted to better characterize its features. This study of the International PHACE Syndrome Registry represents the largest central review of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic data for cardiovascular anomalies in patients with PHACE to date. Sixty-two (41{\%}) of 150 subjects had intracardiac, aortic arch, or brachiocephalic vessel anomalies. Aberrant origin of a subclavian artery was the most common cardiovascular anomaly (present in 31 (21{\%}) of 150 subjects). Coarctation was the second most common anomaly, identified in 28 (19{\%}) of 150 subjects, and can be missed clinically in patients with PHACE because of the frequent association of arch obstruction with aberrant subclavian origin. Twenty-three (37{\%}) of 62 subjects with cardiovascular anomalies required procedural intervention. A greater percentage of hemangiomas were located on the left side of the head and neck in patients with coarctation (46{\%} vs 39{\%}); however, hemangioma distribution did not predict the presence of cardiovascular anomalies overall. In conclusion, PHACE is associated with a high risk of congenital heart disease. Cardiac and aortic arch imaging with detailed assessment of arch patency and brachiocephalic origins is essential for any patient suspected of having PHACE. Longitudinal investigation is needed to determine the long-term outcomes of cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE.",
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AU - Cordisco, Maria R.

AU - Frieden, Ilona J.

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AU - North, Paula E.

AU - Pope, Elena

AU - Shieh, Joseph T.

AU - Southern, James F.

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AU - Siegel, Dawn H.

AU - Drolet, Beth A.

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