Confronting the ethical challenges to informed consent in emergency medicine research

Terri Schmidt, David Salo, Jason A. Hughes, Jean T. Abbott, Joel M. Geiderman, Catherine X. Johnson, Katie B. McClure, Mary Pat McKay, Junaid A. Razzak, Raquel M. Schears, Robert C. Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine believes that protection of human subjects is vital in emergency medicine research and that, whenever feasible, informed consent is at the heart of that protection. At the same time, the emergency setting presents unique barriers to informed consent both because of the time frame in which the research is performed and because patients in the emergency department are a vulnerable population. This report reviews the concept of informed consent, empirical data on patients' cognitive abilities during an emergency, the federal rules allowing exemption from consent under certain circumstances, issues surrounding consent forms, and the new Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations as they relate to research. The authors conclude that, in many circumstances, informed consent is possible if the researcher is diligent and takes time to adequately explain the study to the potential subject. In cases in which it is possible to obtain consent, precautions must be taken to ensure that subjects have decision-making capacity and are offered time to have their questions answered and their needs met. Sometimes resuscitation and other emergency medicine research must be conducted without the ability to obtain consent. In these cases, special protections of subjects under the exception from consent guidelines must be followed. Protection of research subjects is the responsibility of every researcher in emergency medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1082-1089
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Emergency Medicine
Informed Consent
Aptitude
Research
Emergencies
Research Personnel
Research Subjects
Consent Forms
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
Vulnerable Populations
Resuscitation
Hospital Emergency Service
Decision Making
Guidelines

Keywords

  • emergency medicine
  • ethics
  • informed consent
  • research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Schmidt, T., Salo, D., Hughes, J. A., Abbott, J. T., Geiderman, J. M., Johnson, C. X., ... Solomon, R. C. (2004). Confronting the ethical challenges to informed consent in emergency medicine research. Academic Emergency Medicine, 11(10), 1082-1089. https://doi.org/10.1197/j.aem.2004.05.028

Confronting the ethical challenges to informed consent in emergency medicine research. / Schmidt, Terri; Salo, David; Hughes, Jason A.; Abbott, Jean T.; Geiderman, Joel M.; Johnson, Catherine X.; McClure, Katie B.; McKay, Mary Pat; Razzak, Junaid A.; Schears, Raquel M.; Solomon, Robert C.

In: Academic Emergency Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 10, 10.2004, p. 1082-1089.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmidt, T, Salo, D, Hughes, JA, Abbott, JT, Geiderman, JM, Johnson, CX, McClure, KB, McKay, MP, Razzak, JA, Schears, RM & Solomon, RC 2004, 'Confronting the ethical challenges to informed consent in emergency medicine research', Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 11, no. 10, pp. 1082-1089. https://doi.org/10.1197/j.aem.2004.05.028
Schmidt T, Salo D, Hughes JA, Abbott JT, Geiderman JM, Johnson CX et al. Confronting the ethical challenges to informed consent in emergency medicine research. Academic Emergency Medicine. 2004 Oct;11(10):1082-1089. https://doi.org/10.1197/j.aem.2004.05.028
Schmidt, Terri ; Salo, David ; Hughes, Jason A. ; Abbott, Jean T. ; Geiderman, Joel M. ; Johnson, Catherine X. ; McClure, Katie B. ; McKay, Mary Pat ; Razzak, Junaid A. ; Schears, Raquel M. ; Solomon, Robert C. / Confronting the ethical challenges to informed consent in emergency medicine research. In: Academic Emergency Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 10. pp. 1082-1089.
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