Competition and coexistence between Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in the dental biofilm

Jens Kreth, Justin Merritt, Wenyuan Shi, Fengxia Qi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

247 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The human mucosal surface is colonized by the indigenous microflora, which normally maintains an ecological balance among different species. Certain environmental or biological factors, however, may trigger disruption of this balance, leading to microbial diseases. In this study, we used two oral bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis (formerly S. sanguis), as a model to probe the possible mechanisms of competition/ coexistence between different species which occupy the same ecological niche. We show that the two species engage in a multitude of antagonistic interactions temporally and spatially; occupation of a niche by one species precludes colonization by the other, while simultaneous colonization by both species results in coexistence. Environmental conditions, such as cell density, nutritional availability, and pH, play important roles in determining the outcome of these interactions. Genetic and biochemical analyses reveal that these interspecies interactions are possibly mediated through a well-regulated production of chemicals, such as bacteriocins (produced by S. mutans) and hydrogen peroxide (produced by S. sanguinis). Consistent with the phenotypic characteristics, production of bacteriocins and H2O2 are regulated by environmental conditions, as well as by juxtaposition of the two species. These sophisticated interspecies interactions could play an essential part in balancing competition/coexistence within multispecies microbial communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7193-7203
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Bacteriology
Volume187
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Bacteriocins
Streptococcus mutans
Biofilms
Streptococcus
Tooth
Nutritive Value
Biological Factors
Occupations
Hydrogen Peroxide
Molecular Biology
Cell Count

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Competition and coexistence between Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in the dental biofilm. / Kreth, Jens; Merritt, Justin; Shi, Wenyuan; Qi, Fengxia.

In: Journal of Bacteriology, Vol. 187, No. 21, 11.2005, p. 7193-7203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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